Cassie Mcquater

Halo
In these six animated paintings presented as a single channel video, the artist reenacts situations and motifs from the first-person shooter series Halo and the erotic videogame Dream Stripper. Conceived as a dynamic, virtual collage, HALO shows short stock animation loops of characters dying over and over, with koi, dining chairs, asteroids, guns, flowers, torches, pinball machines, candles, and discarded pillows floating around them, creating a hypnotic motion.

schnellebuntebilder

Beethoven recomposed
Het audiovisuele project Beethoven hercomponeerde in opdracht van de Duitse omroep WDR is een unieke aanpak om de muziek van Ludwig van Beethoven tastbaar te maken voor mensen met en zonder gehoorbeperking. Om het hele publiek een klassiek concert met hun ogen te laten beleven, werd de symfonie vertaald in een visuele reis door drie generatieve werelden die de melodische beweging, het ritme en de stemmingswisselingen volgden. Deze visuals werden geprojecteerd op een groot monolithisch canvas dat boven het orkest hing. Aan elke kant van het canvas werden drie LED-strips toegevoegd om het toneellandschap te openen in de vorm van de orkestbak. Terwijl de projectie erop gericht was een samenhangend verhaal te vertellen en de verhalende en emotionele aspecten van de muziek weer te geven, werd de lagere resolutie en verschillende lichtintensiteit van de ledstrips gebruikt om de muziek op een nogal didactieve manier over te brengen.

MARC FORNES

Sotto Magnitude
Questo progetto è l’ultimo passo nello sviluppo dopo l’invenzione di Marc Fornes su “Computational Mesh Walking as Structural Stripes”. È anche la più grande fino ad oggi come struttura permanente […] Questo progetto sta sfidando l’eredità di Frei Otto (architetto tedesco e ingegnere strutturale) mediante l’uso e lo sviluppo di ciò che definiamo Curvatura Intensiva (in opposizione alla Curvatura Estesa).
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Under Magnitude
This project is the last step in development after Marc Fornes’s invention of “Computational Mesh Walking as Structural Stripes“. It is also the largest to date as a permanent structure […] This project is challenging the legacy of Frei Otto (German architect and structural engineer) by using and developing what we call Intensive Curvature (as opposed to Extended Curvature ).

Kerstin Ergenzinger

Wanderer Spacetime Poetry
Wanderer Spacetime Poetry is a continuously evolving installation series. Wanderers are small modified and individually programmed thermal printers that roam along paper strips that are stretched in different constellations across a space. On their journeys the Wanderers leave traces behind, a line, a dot or words. Like a snail with its trail the units dynamically create a poetic drawing over the course of an exhibition.

Daniel Canogar

Loom
Loom showcases abstract animations developed with data from real-time Google Trends. Popular queries appear momentarily as overlaid text before dissolving into a smoky abstraction. These terms are approached with an accidental lyricism —each word appears and disappears in a trail of saturation. Colors within the animation are determined by the prevalence of a specific topic; the more viral the search is online, the warmer the tones become. Stripped from headlines, graphic imagery, and statistics, each phrase inspires a contemplative experience, a chance for the viewer to ruminate on what is streaming through the collective consciousness at any given time. Loom weaves a social fabric, mixing the transcendental with the banal, to present the spirit of our time in generative motion.

Le Fawnhawk

Modern Desert Magic
Petecia Le Fawnhawk is a modern surrealist whose body of work is a meditation in form as monuments juxtaposed against minimal and ethereal desert landscapes. In placing elemental shapes in a vast dreamscape, Petecia strips away the unnecessary in an attempt to reveal truth in the mysterious and magisterial.

DANIEL BUREN

دانيال بورين
丹尼尔·布伦
다니엘 뷰렌
ダニエル·ビュラン
ДАНИЭЛЬ БЮРЕН

Daniel Buren a french conceptualist who is well known for his trademark work with stripes is oftentimes referred to as an abstract minimalist.
Challenging the conventional methods of displaying and presenting art, Buren gained notoriety at his first solo exhibition in 1968 when he glued green and white striped materiel to the exterior door of the Apollinaire Gallery in Milan. With a philosophy of reducing art into its more elemental forms while exploring the impact of repetitive motifs, his work with pattern, form and color draws attention to the surrounding environment and architectural framework rather than combating it. Instead of rejecting the environment in which his installations are produced, Buren integrates his art with the space and changes the fundamental nature of the space itself.

Akram Khan

Until the Lions
In this partial adaptation of poet Karthika Naïr’s book Until the Lions: Echoes from the Mahabharata, an original reworking of the epic Mahabharata, Khan uses kathak and contemporary dance to tell the tale of Amba, a princess abducted on her wedding day and stripped of her honour, who invokes the gods to seek revenge. In an epic theatrical piece, Khan explores the notion and the physical expression of gender, bringing together some of the stellar artistic team behind his solo DESH: writer Karthika Naïr, visual artist Tim Yip, lighting designer Michael Hulls and dramaturg Ruth Little.

FRANCK SORBIER

On stage, the ample white strapless dress of a still model serves as a screen for all kinds of projections that echo those of a big screen in the background. “Mixing 3D video with certified fairy tale stories and tailoring tradition” is the idea of the atypical Mountain Ash. Intel technology brings to life on the fabric all kinds of patterns simulating embroidery or painting on silk: stripes of neon lights, butterflies flapping their wings, “mapping” of crystal tassels or the northern lights …

 

ELECTRONICOS FANTASTICOS!

Electro-Magnetic Band
Barcodress/Barcodance
ELECTRONICOS FANTASTICOS! project has been reincarnating various retired consumer electronics as musical instruments such as Electric Fan Harp, CRT-TV Drums, Air Conditioner Harp etc. The band plays them by catching electromagnetic waves. The Barcodress project aims to create the new kind of dance performance. The clothes which recorded sounds as striped patterns, and dancers, and the performers who scan the clothes, together make electric sound waves in real time. By expanding the principles of sound recording and playback to the body, we explore new possibilities for music and dance expression.

Marleen Sleeuwits

INTERIOR N0. 58

Primarily working within abandoned office spaces, her process involves stripping the rooms down to their individual components, laying bare the layers found beneath the surfaces. She then re-assembles the room using materials found on-site, such as fluorescent tubes, paper towels, laminate, and tape, by adapting techniques of sculpture, painting and drawing.

SAM BUXTON

Electric Chair

The distinctive work of Sam Buxton is dominated by his innovative use of advanced materials and technologies. From his immensely popular MIKRO series (miniature fold-up sculptures, laser cut into thin strips of stainless steel through an acid etching process) to his explorations concerning interactive intelligent surfaces on the familiar objects around us, his work has continually managed to blur the lines between art, science and design.Through his work, which has regularly involved relatively common objects ranging from business cards to a dining table, Buxton has demonstrated an ability to see potential in what others take for granted. His on-going efforts in developing objects that can communicate, display information and react to the actions of the user, demonstrate his commitment to investigating the delicate relationship between the human body and its environment. Buxton’s fusion of art and science has resulted in a highly innovative and unique range of personal designs, many of which, have utilized the latest, most advanced materials and technologies available.

Merce Cunningham

简宁汉
מרס קנינגהם
マース·カニングハム
머시 디스 커닝햄
МЕРС КАННИНГЕМ
« Scenario » de Merce Cunningham
Rei Kawakubo’s humorous costumes toy with the idea of physical distortions, such as humps and big rear ends. They are in mostly vertical blue stripes on white, or in pale green and white-checkered patterns. For much of the dance, five or six dancers twist and pose, each in his or her own space, with a rush of additional dancers to the stage toward the end of the performance. The bold electronic musical score is by Takehisa Kosugi.

Jordan Wolfson

요르단 울프슨
ジョーダンウォルフソン

Female Figure

The stare of the animatronic sculpture is so intense, it would put anyone uncomfortable. The mask is probably there as a way to avoid creating a human face using animatronics but it also definitely adds to the creepiness of the overall look. The importance of the gaze is found throughout Wolfson’s work but it finds here a very special interpretation. He gives the ability to gaze to two different entities, a stripper and a robot, who are by definition never supposed to look up. The visitor is no longer in control of the situation, creating the awkwardness that is at the core of the work.

TIM HAWKINSON

蒂姆·霍金森
ティム·ホーキンソン
تيم هاوكينسون
Möbius Ship

The ambitious and imaginative structure of Hawkinson’s sculpture offers an uncanny visual metaphor for Melville’s epic tale, which is often considered the ultimate American novel. Möbius Ship also humorously refers to the mathematical concept of the Möbius Strip. Named after a nineteenth-century astronomer and mathematician, the Möbius Strip is a surface that has only one side, and exists as a continuous curve. Its simple yet complex spatial configuration presents a visual puzzle that parallels Hawkinson’s transformation of the mundane materials into something unexpected.

ATSUSHI AND MAYUMI KAWAMOTO

Riverbank House
Located on a narrow strip of land, sandwiched between a quiet riverbank and a residential neighborhood, the home’s unique form was inspired by the juxtaposed views offered by the surrounding environment. Standing on the riverbank you had views of the calm stream traveling to an unknown destination, unfazed by the birds, joggers and other small life form taking advantage of its natural serenity. However, a few steps down the bank, away from the river, revealed a startlingly contrasting view; homes and more homes, so grounded and monumental.

SOU FUJIMOTO ARCHITECTS

على فوجيموتو
후지모토에
על פוג’ימוטו
НА ФУДЗИМОТО
infinity ring pavilion
An investigation into the ergonomics of seating in both private and public environments, the Infinity Ring takes the preconception of predefined spaces and their rituals and wraps it around a ring, creating a continuous strip of inhabitable spaces. The entire ring is then rotated, thereby generating infinite configurations of space-between-space, creating endless ways to sit, climb, lie down, crawl on…resulting in spatial configurations that are much richer than the sum of its parts.

THOMAS HEATHERWICK

Bombay Sapphire Distillery
The existing buildings at the complex were built during the Victorian era to house a mill that produced paper for English bank notes. The buildings were later abandoned and left derelict until the complex was bought by Bombay Sapphire, the gin brand owned by alcoholic drinks giant Bacardi, who commissioned Heatherwick to overhaul the site, creating a new distillery and visitors’ centre […] Two curving glass greenhouses form the major new additions to the site. Hot air is channeled into the greenhouses through large pipes clad in strips of metal, picking up heat produced during the distillation process and carrying it out through openings in the red-brick walls of one of the existing buildings.

Robin Baumgarten

line-wobbler
file 2019
‘Line Wobbler’ is a one-dimensional dungeon crawler with a custom controller made out of a steel spring and a five-metre long LED strip display. The entire game runs on an Arduino, with sound, particle effects and 120+fps. ‘Line Wobbler’ is an award-winning experiment in minimalism in game design, making use of novel input mechanics, retro sound, and the incorporation of physical architectural space into the game. In the game, players navigate obstacles and fight enemies to reach the exit, in a series of increasingly difficult levels. Movement is controlled by bending the Wobble controller forward and back, while enemies are attacked by flicking the spring at them. Obstacles such as lava fields, conveyor belts and slopes challenge the navigation skills of the player.

Stephen Scott

Bowed Piano
Few chamber groups deploy their musicians as oddly as the Bowed Piano Ensemble. The 10 players, students led by the composer Stephen Scott, stand around, and sometimes under, a concert grand, armed with items of all kinds — nylon fishing line, piano hammers, guitar picks, strips of paper, rolls of plumber’s tape — and reach into the instrument to draw sounds from its strings.

Liva Isakson

To Hold Sway
Met een werkproces gebaseerd op experimenten rond materiaal en hun verschillende kwaliteiten, creëert Liva Isakson Lundin ruimtelijke installaties waar spanning, gewicht en balans van groot belang zijn. Met materiaal als latex, gelatine en stripstaal laat ze de kwaliteit van het materiaal en de relatie met de ruimte de uiteindelijke vorm van het werk bepalen. Ondanks dat de werken stil zijn, stralen ze een sterke beweging en spanning uit. Door het gebruik van materiaal, maat en vorm moeten de stukken als zeer lichamelijk worden omschreven en wordt de toeschouwer aangetrokken tot het aanraken en voelen van de werken.

Alma Haser

birdgirl
It’s hard to pin down what media German artist Alma Haser actually works with: Her series involve photography, cut-up collages, rephotographing prints, and weaving together multiple images to strike a balance of time and space. Take I Always Have To Repeat Myself, for example. Each piece layers two or more prints either physically (weaving or overlaying strips of different photographs to add a sense of depth and dimension) or within a new frame—a number of the pieces feature sitters manipulating photographs of themselves, playing with perspective to offer and dizzying and disorienting fresh take on portraiture and image making.

Olivia Locher

Horizontal stripes

Yoshi Sodeoka

袖岡由英
Pollock GIF
FILE LED SHOW 2015
Trying to understand what makes a Pollock a Pollock has prompted any number of artists to try out his technique (for reference, see the Saatchi Art “Inspired by Jackson Pollock” collection). Count Yoshi Sodeoka among them. Though none of his Pollock GIFs look or feel exactly like a Pollock, there’s still that goal of unabated movement, of which a GIF can capture better, and perhaps more so, than a strip of paint.

FILE SAO PAULO

FELIX KLEIN

克莱因瓶
Klein’s bottle

The Klein bottle is a non-orientable surface; informally, it is a surface in which notions of left and right cannot be consistently defined.Simplifying things: A Möbius strip is a simpler example of a non-orientable object. That means it has no inside or outside. Add another aspect – having no boundaries – to it, it gets more complex and you end up with a Klein bottle.

Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B Nguyen

Hubris Ate Nemesis
Curvy and bent wooden strips are laid out to resemble a wave in this installation in Maine, created by local designers Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B Nguyen. Kavanaugh and Nguyen designed the Hubris Atë Nemesis installation for the Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA), taking cues from the from the rough waters and wind in Maine. Long, timber strips are layered across the floor and up the ceiling to fill the open-plan gallery space, with crests curling over entrances to other parts of the contemporary art gallery.

MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY

マイケル·クラーク·カンパニー
Tate Project Part I ]

The choreography rehearsed and performed in 2010 paired the rigour of classical steps with contemporary movement, a juxtaposition that paralleled Clark’s training as a ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet, and his later anti-hierarchical, anti-authoritarian choreographic experiments. Balletic poses, jumps and steps were isolated from traditional narrative sequences and made strange through repetition. The graceful leaps and turns of the trained dancers seemed awkward and uneven, just as they were often out of sync and oriented in different directions. This choreography paralleled the performance space, which was demarcated by geometric and striped floor mats designed by Charles Atlas, which resembled the large windows at the back of the hall and the black beams that extend vertically from floor to ceiling.

MIAO XIAOCHUN

fluoroscopy
Miao Xiaochun creates and builds virtual worlds for twenty years, unlimited in size, perspective and imagination. Populated by strange cybernetic beings, stripped of every habit, character or expression, these universes superimpose the images of the great classics of Western art with futuristic, highly urbanized and technologically technologized settings.

TERRY HAGGERTY

British-born artist Terry Haggerty, who currently lives and works in Berlin, is known for his paintings that express the formalist vocabulary of abstraction in a new way. Light-colored stripes alternate with darker ones to form regular, often horizontal arrangements, which also have a pattern like quality due to their dense structure. The special thing about them is, that Haggerty breaks this linear formation at the edges of the painting by bending the lines in a different direction as the boundaries of the painting would support. His method transforms the structure of the painting into a illusory perception of three-dimensionality within the image. The surface seems to continue beyond the boundaries of the picture and reflects the illusion of a third dimension back onto the pictorial motif.

AHN SUN MI

安宣美
mobius strip

The young Korean photographer, Ahn Sun Mi lets us discover her through self portraits. She opens up her poetic universe, a world between dream and reality, where nostalgic feelings cradled by childhood fairy tales and the pursuit of her own inaccessible and voluptuous femininity are the essence of her inspiration. Sun Mi envelops in her familiar world of childhood with her sweet self portraits where toys from the past come to reassure her in a friendly way. Soap bubbles, teddy bears, umbrellas and fluorescent wigs seem to travel with her to the Milky Way in her quest to become a mature woman.

Ana Teresa Barboza

АНА ТЕРЕЗА ​​БАРБОСА
Volver a Mirar

Ana Teresa Barboza mixes embroidery and drawing within her collected works. Using the fur of animals as a perfect leeway for her stitching technique, Barboza layers thin strips of string expertly to imitate the texture of a creature’s fur. While animals and vegetation are richly detailed in her works, she chooses to display her human subject matter as basic, black stitched figures or graphite drawing. The end result is a texturized feast for the eyes.

MARINA HOERMANSEDER

[…]Her first collection reflects her inspirational playground of sculpturing leather by moulding it to the body, twisting buckles, leather straps creating volume, a fabric made out of medical bandages and all over ruffled silk. This fashion statement comes along with a high level of quality and handcraft. A lot of the pieces are fully studded by hand and profoundly processed. The vegetably tanned leather is hand painted and one dress consists out of more than 100 meters auf silk strips. By adding accessories such as leather headpieces and armcuffs, she balances a striking inspiration to a high level of contemporary fashion.

Charlotte Posenenske

Posenenske applied primary coloured sticky strips to paper, creasing them and then applying them in layers until shapes were built up – as in CMP 65 (1965) for example. She progressed to using sheet metal sprayed with monochrome paint which she then folded into sculptural shapes, and combined this with corrugated cardboard to produce the series ‘Vierkantrohre’ (Square Tubes, 1967) which look like ventilation shafts. She conceived these early sculptures as modules that could be adapted according to available space, each one assembled into a shape ultimately appropriate to the context it found itself in.

Marc Fornes

Under Magnitude
This project is the latest step within the development following Marc Fornes invention on “Computational Mesh Walking as structural Stripes”. It is also the largest to date as permanent structure[…] This project is challenging the heritage of Frei Otto (German Architect and Structural Engineer) by the use and developement of what we define as Intensive Curvature (as opposed to Extensive Curvature).

joseph walsh studio

Enignum Shelf XIII
“In the Enignum series of work, I have stripped wood into thin layers, manipulating and reconstructing them into free form compositions. I then shape through these layers to reveal not only the honesty of the structure but the sculpted form which is a unique collaboration of man and material. The title derives from the Latin words Enigma (‘mystery’) and Lignum (‘wood’), for me they sum up the series: the mystery of the composition lies in the material.”

ANA TERESA BARBOZA

آنا تيريزا باربوزا
АНА ТЕРЕЗА ​​БАРБОСА

Ana Teresa Barboza mixes embroidery and drawing within her collected works. Using the fur of animals as a perfect leeway for her stitching technique, Barboza layers thin strips of string expertly to imitate the texture of a creature’s fur. While animals and vegetation are richly detailed in her works, she chooses to display her human subject matter as basic, black stitched figures or graphite drawing. The end result is a texturized feast for the eyes.

MICHAEL GOTTE ET VELDANA SEHIC

Clavilux
Clavilux 2000 is a subtle music visualization installation that represents the playing of sounds by way of a simultaneous animation that can be interpreted. For every note played on the keyboard, a stripe appears of which the dimensions, position and color correspond to the way the particular key was stroke.

MIKE NELSON

迈克·尼尔森
Mike Nelson (b. 1967) is one of the most appreciated artists of his generation. His work predominantly features sculpture and meticulously constructed, large-scale architectural installations. In this new work created for Malmö Konsthall, Nelson uses the institutional architecture as a backdrop for a massive concrete workshop. The exhibition space is divided by a glass wall into two spaces; a smaller production workshop and an exhibition space stripped back to its original configuration.

Owen Mundy

A Single Composite
A Single Composite is a series of kinetic installations and projection apparatuses that stretch, twist, and loop film strips containing declassified and other found reconnaissance footage. Using reconstituted digital printer chassis, this cinematic enterprise is projected on walls, ceilings, and floors, to form a series of individual moments of surveillance and implied violence.

Leslie Henshaw

Chromatophores Collection
“Chromatophores are the cells that give some creatures of nature the miraculous ability to change their colour to protect themselves,” says Leslie. “Like chameleons, jellyfish, cuttlefish and frogs they can change from muted tones into brightly coloured and vibrant stripes or patches of colours that are mesmerising. With this collection I imagined what it would be like if humans could perform this amazing feat with their hair.”

TODD BURRIS

Eyeglasses
Burris likes black—not just the black that contrasts with white backgrounds, human skins and other trappings. He likes black hair, black stripes, black fabric, black hats and boots, and perhaps even a black way of seeing things… It would be less noticeable if his photographs were in color, but that would take away from their nostalgic charm.

JUSTINE KHAMARA

Жюстин Khamara

You could think that the work of Melbourne-based artist Justine Khamara was digitally manipulated. Though Justine actually hand-cuts the photographs to rearrange and collage them afterwards. Some of the collages were even cut into thin strips then woven. Seeking to disrupt photography’s smooth, two-dimensional surfaces, Justine collages and builds sculptures entirely out of portrait photographs.

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.

Arcangel Constantini

Phonotube
Phonotube are experimental instruments for live audio visual performance, constructed as Luminous instruments and sound sequencers, that use fluorescent lamp tubes and LED strips, as light sources. The tubes are covered with negative ofsset, printed with sound patterns that spin at variable speed. The oscillation from the light emitted by these patterns is transduced to sound, processed by light excitation, a variety of electronic circuits as pre-amps with photo-cells and phototransitors, voltage control oscillators, relays, Filters, 1bit attiny85 micro controler. The technological principle is based on the photophone, patented by Graham Bell and inspired by audio visuals experimenters as Norman Mclaren,that used the optical sound technology of Film. In the history of the invention of electronic sound instruments, the study of light and its behavior as a particle or wave, and its application to sound processes, had a relevant position and is currently, one of the areas of scientific research with the greatest potential in human communication.

Daniel Temkin

Glitchometry monochrome stripes

POUL GERNES

Drømmeskib / Dream Ship
n the early 1960s, Poul Gernes started to concentrate on simple, reduced forms making strong visual effects like circles, stripes or dots in his painting, similar to pop motivs. Most of the approx. 40 Targets painted then were designs for architecture-related works. At first he drew the rings for his Targets in pencil, but later he went over to scratching them into the ground with a pair of compasses. This gave the paintings a relief-like character and created clearly defined color fields. The contrasting color intensities in the circles make each color seem like a distinct, three-dimensional volume. The vivid color combinations of the Targets (shown at the Venice Biennale in 1988) come from sketches or ready-mades like the stripes on a t-shirt. Sometimes Gernes used random systems as well, for example by putting paint pots behind him and dipping the paintbrush into one pot blind. Although it may not seem to be the case, Gernes’ work makes no passing references to contemporary works by other artists.

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

Stripe Drawing Transparent view

ROBERT WHITMAN

Mobius Strip

Many people first pick up a camera to record their passions whatever they may be. But sooner or later, the best of them find that photography itself is their real passion. That’s true of Robert Whitman. Along the way, he found not just a pastime, but a way of life.
As a young hippie traveling the world after college, Robert found that with his camera he had entree to people and places he never would have encountered. He’s been on a life long journey of discovery ever since, with stops in Brazil, Cuba, Arizona, Miami Beach, Moscow, and Uruguay, just to name a few of the places where he’s lived and worked.

1024 ARCHITECTURE

FILE LED Show

The art-technology exhibition of FILE São Paulo 2013 brings the new interactive work by the famous 1024 architecture group to be presented on the gigantic LED panel of FIESP building on Paulista Avenue. People could change the images on the panel through their voices or by humming a song.
The 1024 architecture group created the “interactive LED” digital graphic project for the Paulista Avenue, which will be presented from July 22 through August 18, 2013. The project consists of a podium with a microphone installed on the sidewalk of the Paulista Avenue, where people could interact through the vocal conversion into musical notes. The 1024 architecture group elaborated a brand new algorithm for this project, which changes the graphic behaviors by means of sounds. Depending on the note sung, several parameters of the program, such as colors, shapes, density, and rhythms (squares, circles, stripes, etc.), will change.

BECCY RIDSDEL

Бекки Ридсдель
Ceramics stripped to the bone

ALEX RAYMOND

Flash Gordon
The Greatest Adventure of All

Flash Gordon is the hero of an adventure and science fiction newspaper strip (planetary novel) originally designed by Alex Raymond. First published on January 7, 1934
In 1979, Filmation produced a cartoon series based on comic books (“The New Adventures of Flash Gordon”), and its first season is remembered as one of the studio’s best works. Although this series was first released, the Gordon Flash TV movie, the Greatest Adventure of Them All, was produced earlier.

PETER COFFIN

פיטר קופין
ピーター·コフィン
spiral staircase

Coffin’s Untitled (Spiral Staircase) takes the idea of a simple architectural fitting to an absurd extreme. Reminiscent of Escher’s Infinite Staircase, Coffin’s winding steps are moulded into a circle, inexhaustibly twisting in impossible logic made real. By remodeling the steps, Coffin strips the staircase of its function, turning a thing which is normally engaged with physicality into a dizzying conceptual game. Through his humorous constructions, Coffin bridges art history and everyday experience, subverting the preconceptions of both.