Quayola

Transient
Transient – Impermanent paintings is an audiovisual concert for two motorized pianos and two conductors in collaboration with generative algorithms. Hyper-realistic digital brushstrokes articulate endlessly on a large-scale projection as if on a real canvas. Each brushstroke is sonified with a piano note, creating polyphonic synesthetic landscapes. The project continues Quayola’s research on traditional artistic techniques in the context of human-machine relationship, this time gradually withdrawing from formal subjects and giving way to the computational substance: the algorithm.

Jeremy Rotsztain

BECHA-KPACHA
BECHA-KPACHA is an algorithmic music video for the electronic musician COH. The song’s tittle (pronounced Vesna Krasna) was taken from an old Russian poem and roughly translates “Spring the beautiful”, though it can also mean “Spring the red.” The animation reference’s traditional Russian folk patterns, commonly known as Hohloma. In these patterns, colorful plant leaves expand and twist around one another while fruit grows along side. These patterns were a starting point for this sound-responsive animation.

Zaha Hadid Architects

Beijing’s newest airport
The core of the modern architecture project, which is the place where the passengers move through, was inspired by traditional Chinese architecture designs

Tobias Gremmler

Virtual Actors in Chinese Opera
Created for a theater piece that fuses Chinese Opera  with New Media, the virtual actors are inspired by shapes, colors and motions of traditional Chinese costumes and dance. The project explores how costumes and motions can virtually reshape a human body.

Hybe

Light Tree: Interactive Dan Flavin
HYBE’s Light Tree: Interactive Dan Flavin re-illuminates the minimalist fluorescent light tubes of Dan Flavin from the 1960s, through digital technology. Experimenting with light and its effect, Flavin explored artistic meaning in relationships between light, situation, and environment. The readymade fluorescent light fixtures he used created space divided and adjusted by light and composition, offering a newly structured space with light. HYBE’s work expands the logic of Flavin by reinforcing the physical property of light through interactive media. It presents an escape from traditional lighting, as light and color changes when touched by viewers. Lighting here is divided into front and back, and colors are programmed to maintain complementary colors. The front lighting constantly interacts with colors on a back wall through visual contrast and mixture. A random change and diffusion of light with the involvement of viewers provokes tension extending and segmenting space, turning space into a forum for emotional perceptual experience.

Verena Friedrich

THE LONG NOW
A soap bubble usually remains stable for only a few moments – it is a perfectly formed sphere with an iridescent surface that reflects its surroundings. As one of the classical vanitas symbols the soap bubble traditionally stands for the transience of the moment and the fragility of life. THE LONG NOW approaches the soap bubble from a contemporary perspective – with reference to its chemical and physical properties as well as recent scientific and technological developments. THE LONG NOW is aimed at extending the lifespan of a soap bubble, or even to preserve it forever. Using an improved formula, a machine generates a bubble, sends it to a chamber with a controlled atmosphere and keeps it there in suspension for as long as possible. The project is presented in the form of an experimental set-up in which the newly created soap bubble oscillates permanently between fragility and stability.

Nelo Akamatsu

Chijikinkutsu
“Chijikinkutsu” is a coinage, specially created for the title of this work by mingling two Japanese words: “Chijiki” and “Suikinkutsu”.”Chijiki” means geomagnetism: terrestrial magnetic properties that cannot be sensed by the human body but that exists everywhere on earth. Since long before the Age of Discovery, people have traveled with navigation using compasses employing geomagnetism. In recent years, various devises that utilize geomagnetism have even been incorporated into smartphones[…] “Suikinkutsu” is a sound installation for a Japanese traditional garden, invented in the Edo period. The sounds of water drops falling into an earthenware pot buried under a stone wash basin resonate through hollow bamboo utensils. The concept of the work “Chijikinkutsu” does not derive from experimentalism of science and technology on which media arts rely, nor from architectural theory of western music upon which some sound arts lay their foundation. While utilizing the action of geomagnetism normally treated as a subject of science, this sound installation expands the subtle sounds of “Suikinkutsu” in the context of Japanese perspective on Nature.

FRANCK SORBIER

On stage, the ample white strapless dress of a still model serves as a screen for all kinds of projections that echo those of a big screen in the background. “Mixing 3D video with certified fairy tale stories and tailoring tradition” is the idea of the atypical Mountain Ash. Intel technology brings to life on the fabric all kinds of patterns simulating embroidery or painting on silk: stripes of neon lights, butterflies flapping their wings, “mapping” of crystal tassels or the northern lights …

 

Diana Thater

Abyss of Light

Abyss of Light is divided into three screens and into three acts, the traditional structure of classic narrative film. In the first act, all the images synchronize to form a single panorama of Bryce Canyon in Utah. In the second, the screens break away from one another into three parallel sequences wherein each projection shows the same one hundred images at different speeds. In the third, all three images synchronize once again to form a single wrapping panorama of Death Valley, California. The work is an ode to the American western, one of my favorite film genres. Despite my admiration, however, my desire is not to imitate westerns. Instead, I set up an abstraction in opposition to the idea of narrative, something that can be seen in all of my work. In Abyss of Light, continuous disruptions of the American landscape document my refusal to see the land as backdrop for man’s heroic conquering of the wild; instead I see it as a foreground, a subject to be contemplated for itself and for which wildness is a state of grace.

FEDERICO DIAZ

geometric death frequency 141

The title of the piece is a pun that, with irony, alludes to the exceeding of tradition, irreconcilable dichotomy between life and death in a sculpture made, provocatively, by lifeless forms“, adds Diaz. “The line between life and none-life is more fleeing than we usually think: think about a virus that attacks a complex organism and reproduces in the same way as a micro-organism, even though it’s only an agglomerated of lifeless molecules: a natural crystal that, even though is a stone, can be born and undergo a fascinated process of growth that mimes perfectly the ways of an organic life“.

REIN VOLLENGA

The Ultimate Acceptance
THE ARTIST REIN VOLLENGA IS KNOWN FOR HIS HIGHLY VISCERAL SCULPTURES THAT SHOW A FASCINATION FOR THE HUMAN BODY MERGED WITH A SYNTHETIC AESTHETIC. THESE OPPOSITES ARE REFLECTED IN HIS TECHNIQUE OF COMBINING FOUND GENERIC OBJECTS WITH TRADITIONALLY HAND-SCULPTED MATERIAL, THE CRAFTSMANSHIP BEING IN STARK CONTRADICTION TO THE SLEEK HIGH GLOSS SURFACES OF THE FINISHED WORK. VOLLENGA’S SCULPTURES HAVE BEEN EXHIBITED IN BOTH MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES.

Vincent Lapp

“To me couture is the best source of excitement in fashion. Our debut collection was mix between couture orientated fashion and ready-to-wear. With AV Couture, I hope to create a true couture atelier, which stands for traditional craftsmanship and perfection.
Working for my own label was always my biggest dream. AV Couture is an instrument to visualize our thoughts, and all the society’s absurdities we think are essential to tackle.” Vincent Lapp

Bert

“We are fully aware that architecture is this serious and profound craft with a long culture and tradition. You see that when we architects find reference for our projects in art, philosophy, literature or nature. For this project, we also looked at art to find reference. But not at Michaelangelo or Dali. Rather we looked at cartoon characters of Sesame Street or Minions. We took a playful look at this project and wanted to create a rather unique character than a conventional building. A quirky looking character that becomes part of the wildlife of a forest. I think this quirkiness can create feelings and emotions. And maybe these are attributes in architecture that are missing these days.”

PEEPING TOM

32 rue vandenbranden
The script of physical actions is inspired by the Japanese film A ballad de Naraiama (1983), by Shohei Imamura, the one with tearing images, like that of the son carrying his mother on his back, embraced by the wind, climbing the mountain to put her on the summit until death, as the local tradition says that every septuagenarian must have an equal destiny. In the same village in the late 19th century, parents used to sell babies to survive. These material and spiritual miseries do not bring literals to the stage. Rather, they are essentials that make the show a fabulous visual poem written in and with the body and the scenic space. The song is also celebrated at the height, with moments such as Stravinski’s The Bird of Fire suite, and the song Fline on you crazy diamond, by the band Pink Floyd.

PETER MOVRIN

“Movrin’s main inspiration has always been his childhood, where tradition, God and meat were the subject of everyday life. As an only son of a butcher in a small Slovenian town, surrounded by woods and bears, his growing up marked him with a roughness that he transcends in his designs with a special kind of romanticism. In this hard provincial life meat became his medium of expression, as a child he would carve steaks in a way that would appeal to his bewildered eye. There were, however, also fresh issues of Vogue magazines in the house, brought from trips to Trieste, that stirred up his imagination.” Black Sheep

mode:Niko Riam

SAM TAYLOR WOOD

a little death

Despite the broader reference to the traditional pictorial genre of “still life”, disseminated from the Dutch and Spanish painters of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, ‘Still life’ from 2001 and ‘A little death’ from 2002 refer especially to the painting of transient elements of the French Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin (1699-1779) to discuss the distortion and inexorability of time, the finitude of life or, above all, the interdependence between life and death. The title makes a direct reference to the expression with which the French philosopher Georges Bataille defined the orgasm: ‘une petite mort‘.

ELIŠKA SKY

Kingdom of Sport
Series Kingdom of Sport connects the reference to the traditional renaissance portraits and modern sport culture. It was inspired by the classic portrait painting and the greek mythology, especially visible in the short film. Each model demonstrates their constructed ‘royal’ character with one type of sport specialisation. Sport equipment is cleverly integrated into the styling, fashion accessories and set design.

Neri Oxman

Neri Oxman: Material Ecology

Vespers

“Vespers is a collection of 15 3-D-printed masks that explore the idea of designing with live biological materials. The collection consists of three distinct series, each reinterpreting the concept of the death mask—traditionally a wax or plaster impression of a corpse’s face. Taken as a whole, the three series form a narrative arc from death to rebirth. In the first series, Oxman and The Mediated Matter Group looked at the death mask as a cultural artifact. Fabricated using an algorithm that deconstructed polyhedral meshes into subdivided surfaces, the masks were 3-D printed with photopolymers, as well as with bismuth, silver, and gold, and rendered in color combinations that recur in religious practices around the world.” Rachel Morón

Eve Bailey

ИВ БЭЙЛИ
ENTASIS DANCE IV
My work is based on the concepts of balance and coordination. The body interests me as a perceiving mechanical structure. I use my own body as a primary tool to create pieces that experiment with equilibrium through physical, mechanical, plastic and conceptual means. My studio practice is rooted in the tradition of the artist engineer. I design and build suspended and pendular constructions that can sustain their own weight and mine as I perform with them. By climbing and inverting on the structures, I challenge my own perception and creative process.

Zaha Hadid Architects

bow chair
designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, Ross Lovegrove and Daniel Widrig

Bow is the latest result of the extensive, ongoing research that ZHA is conducting within the domains of 3D printing and material experimentation.The chair combines pristine design informed by structural optimisation processes typically found in nature, with innovative materials and the most advanced fabrication methods. The pattern and the colour gradient concur in redefining the traditional spatial relationship between furniture and its setting.

PHILIP GLASS

فيليب الزجاج
菲利普·格拉斯
פיליפ גלאס
フィリップ·グラス
필립 글래스
Филип Гласс
Einstein On The Beach

ROBERT WILSON
Portrait Trilogy:Einstein; Akhnaten; Gandhi
Einstein on the Beach is an opera in four acts (framed and connected by five “knee plays” or intermezzos), scored by Philip Glass and directed by theatrical producer Robert Wilson. The opera eschews traditional narrative in favor of a formalist approach based on structured spaces laid out by Wilson in a series of storyboards. The music was written “in the spring, summer and fall of 1975.”Glass recounts the collaborative process: “I put [Wilson’s notebook of sketches] on the piano and composed each section like a portrait of the drawing before me. The score was begun in the spring of 1975 and completed by the following November, and those drawings were before me all the time.”

Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui

سيدي العربي الشرقاوي
西迪·拉比·切考维
СИДИ ЛАРБИ ШЕРКАУИ
Noetic

NOETIC ist das Prinzip, das ein kosmisches mit jedem individuellen Bewusstsein verbindet. Die Schönheit dieses Ordnungsgedanken findet sich in Cherkaouis expressiven Tanzbewegungen sowie in den geometrischen Stahlgebilden des Bildenden Künstlers Antony Gormley gespiegelt. Die atmosphärische Dichte wird durch einen traditionellen japanischen live-Perkussionisten und Gesang intensiviert. Raum, Ordnung und Geist werden hier nicht als starre Strukturen, sondern als fließende poetische Strömungen gezeigt.

Eric Singer/LEMUR

LEMUR GuitarBot
File Festival
The “LEMUR GuitarBot” is a robotically controlled electric slide guitar-like instrument. It is comprised of four independently controllable units which can pick and slide extremely rapidly. Resembling neither a traditional robot nor a guitar, it is a new type of instrument with markedly different capabilities than a human guitarist.

MICHAEL BURTON

Astronomical Bodies

Astronomical Bodies is based on the research of Dr. Terence Kee of the University of Leeds. He proposes that that a reactive form of phosphorus arrived on the early Earth via meteorite impacts. His research found that phosphorus from space was more suitable for the chemical reactions to develop complex life. Astronomical Bodies reverses this process and tries to transform phosphorus harvested from the body — in the form of kidney stones and urine — into manmade meteorites. Rather than the traditional idea of transpermia addressed in a host of science fiction writings and films, Astronomical Bodies proposes that the galactic transferal of life-promoting chemicals is a natural process that we can facilitate.

HOLGER LIPPMANN

TriangPaint

Holger Lippmann describes a part of his work as digital painting. What distinguishes digital painting from traditional painting on canvas or paper? We need to distinguish between two categories of digital painting. The first includes works created on the computer with ready-made graphic tools like virtual paint brushes or pens, in something like the way that non-digital pictures are created on paper or canvas. David Hockney’s painting of a sunflower on an i-pad is an example of this. The second category includes works using computer generation, in which programs coded by the artist continually produce new aesthetic concepts as images or animations. Every execution of the software creates new works within the pre-defined boundaries of the system. This process can be called generative painting.

Kimiko Yoshida

URUSHI-E
“Traditionnellement, les images du Genji sont appliquées sur la soie des kimonos, selon une antique technique japonaise de laque mêlée de poudre d’or ou d’argent appelée urushi-e. Ici, cette technique d’urushi-e, littéralement «image laquée», est appliquée sur mes propres autoportraits photographiques qui sont des impressions pigmentaires sur toile. Le dessin à la poudre d’or imite la broderie au fil d’or – il est tellement fin que la reproduction photographique de l’œuvre rend difficilement compte du raffinement de cette technique subtile.” Kimiko Yoshida

Oleg Soroko

After Form
Transformation, fluidity, incompleteness, self-organization are inherent to this forms and images. My mission is to create and bring to our reality images and forms, that was impossible to create with traditional…

Alexis Walsh and Ross Leonardy

The Spire dress
Alexis Walsh is a designer and artist based in New York City. Through the exploration of emerging technologies including 3D printing and digital modeling, integrated with traditional handcraft, Alexis utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to push the boundaries of fashion design. Alexis graduated with honors from Parsons The New School for Design.

ANGELIKA LODERER

Angelika Loderers work is refering to the basic research of form and space. She uses fragile, everyday materials that are derived from the vocabulary of domesticity and combine them with sort of traditional sculptural techniques. In the process the play between chance and control defines the aesthetics of her work. The experimenting with attidudes – via a very specific amalgam of materials, shapes and objects- brings forth a new, metaphysical result. “In transience, fragility and decline, I see the formal expressions to which I refer in my designs, and which to some extent provide the framework conditions for my processoriented work. From the abundance on offer, however fragile and vulnerable in composition, the elements fall into place, becoming worthless once again when dismantled.”

Tokujin Yoshioka

吉冈德仁
吉岡徳仁
transparent mannequins

Considered ‘grid bodies’, or the ‘transparent body installation’ yoshioka has specially conceived these figures to highlight issey miyake’s garments. in room A, one finds the 1970s collections of miyake dressing figures composed out of 365 laser cut cardboard parts, arranged as a grid structure to create a futuristic human body. they are adorned by pieces that investigate miyake’s constant innovation in fabric-making, and his deep respect for tradition.

John Tavener

We shall see Him as He is
”Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when He shall appear, we shall be like Him; for we shall see Him as He is”. the First Epistle of St John, Chapter 3 verse 2
Tavener converted to the Russian Orthodox Church in 1977.[13] Orthodox theology and liturgical traditions became a major influence on his work. He was particularly drawn to its mysticism, studying and setting to music the writings of Church Fathers and completing a setting of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, the principal eucharistic liturgy of the Orthodox Church: this was Tavener’s first directly Orthodox-inspired music

GYÖRGY LIGETI

ג’רג’ ליגטי
Дьердь Лигети
ジェルジ·リゲティ
Le Grand Macabre

In the mid-70s, Ligeti wrote his only opera, Le Grand Macabre, loosely based on the 1934 play, La Balade du grand macabre, by Michel De Ghelderode. It is a work of absurd theatre that contains many eschatological references.After having seen Mauricio Kagel’s anti-operatic work Staatstheater, Ligeti came to the conclusion that it was not possible to write any more anti-operas.[citation needed] He therefore resolved to write an “anti-anti-opera”, an opera with an ironic recognition of both operatic traditions and anti-operatic criticism of the genre. From its brief overture, a mixture of rhythmic sounds scored for a dozen car horns, to the closing passacaglia in mock classical style, the work evolves as collage of sonorities ranging from a grouping of urban sounds to snippets of manipulated Beethoven, Rossini and Verdi.

TRACY FEATHERSTONE

wearable sculptures
Wearable Structures materialize our daily struggle between control and chaos. The balance is precarious and can tip one way or another in an instant. Building materials traditionally used to construct living environments or other architectural securities are used in a frenetic fashion.

Oli Sorenson

LA SOCIETE DE LA PLACE DES SPECTACLES
FILE SAO PAULO 2015
Inspired from the live works of Italian artist Michelangelo Pistoletto (1933-) of meticulously ransacking large mirrors, Sorenson revisited the classical traditions of vanitas under the materiality of video, and generate his creative process from the destruction of consumer components.

Mariko Mori

Enlightenment Capsule
“Enlightenment Capsule, which featured a rainbow-colored acrylic lotus blossom set within a space-age capsule illuminated by sunlight. …Enlightenment Capsule blends traditional symbolism with futuristic elements.” Katrina Klaasmeyer

Kris Lemsalu

Afternoon Tear Drinker
Photo: Nikolaus Weitzer

Kris Lemsalu uses masquerade as a means of expression when staging her performances and installations. The artist spirits us away to a fantasy world, where she however grapples with universal concerns of today such as desire, sexuality and transformation. Drawing on a feminist tradition of performance and staged photography, she combines disparate elements such as human and animal body parts made of ceramic with skins, fabric and garments.

LAURA WAGNER

selfportrait with tongue
Selbstportrait mit Zunge is a video portrait that shows the artist in profile, wearing the traditional dress and hairstyle of her homeland, stretching out her tongue and moving it slowly. Mirroring the non-durational aspect of painting, a conventional means of portraiture, the work isn’t marked by beginning or end points. Selbstportrait mit Zunge challenges the notion of temporality as an essential component of video, a medium that is normally defined by the presence of durational elements.more

Roman Signer

РОМАНА ЗИГНЕРА
Mon voyage a Nantes
The Swiss artist, Roman Signer does not only work a lot with rockets and regularly shoots object into the hemisphere, his work is moreover referred to as “time sculpture”. As with traditional sculptures, Signer also transforms physical material into three dimensional objects, yet they then extend to something one could refer to as fourth dimension or rather the dimension of time.

Ferda Kolatan

Coral Column
Close-up examines the impact of digital technologies on the architectural detail and the traditions of tectonic expression associated with it. An often overlooked condition of digital design technologies is the ability to design objects through continuous degrees of magnification. more

Joyce Lin

Exploded Chair
This piece takes traditional conception of what a chair is, dismantles it, and places it in clear perspex containers. The maple-wood chair that sits loosely within its crystalline sarcophagus looks much like the archetypal kitchen seat. As the ‘Exploded Chair’ is moved, its wooden pieces rattle around inside their compartments. The piece is both familiar and disorienting, playful and disconcerting — a dichotomous piece on which to seat yourself.

echo morgan

the olive tree
Genom performance och film utforskar Echo Morgan sambandet mellan våld, skönhet och sårbarhet. Hon undersöker hur dessa till synes kontrasterande idéer påverkar förståelsen om ’jaget’ och kroppen. Echo Morgan är en performancekonstnär som är baserad i London och växte upp i ChengDu i sydvästra Kina. I sina performance förvandlar hon ofta kroppens yttre med symboler av kinesisk traditionell ikonografi.

Pascale Marthine Tayou

Plastic tree
Tree branches of various distances and dimensions grow horizontally from the surface, inverting the usual experience and traditional relationship we have with trees. rather than leaves, the bark bears brightly colored plastic bags on its edges, crudely tied to each organic limb. While the work stands as a visual symbol of the harmful effects of pollution and consumerism on the environment, ‘plastic tree’ is also an investigation towards the artistic qualities of plastic as a medium, and its incorporation with natural materials.

Rothschild Eva

Cages
Rothschild’s practice involves both conceptual and socio-political ideas alongside traditional approaches to making sculpture. Through an investigation into form and materiality, her works balance, stack, wrap and knot materials around geometric shapes and structures – such materials that often appear to transcend their physical limitations, hover between representation, symbolism and actual form. By deliberately destabilizing physical and visual characteristics in her work, Rothschild not only questions the aesthetics of art, in particular minimalism, but also those of belief in social liberation and spiritual movements.

MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY

マイケル·クラーク·カンパニー
Tate Project Part I ]

The choreography rehearsed and performed in 2010 paired the rigour of classical steps with contemporary movement, a juxtaposition that paralleled Clark’s training as a ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet, and his later anti-hierarchical, anti-authoritarian choreographic experiments. Balletic poses, jumps and steps were isolated from traditional narrative sequences and made strange through repetition. The graceful leaps and turns of the trained dancers seemed awkward and uneven, just as they were often out of sync and oriented in different directions. This choreography paralleled the performance space, which was demarcated by geometric and striped floor mats designed by Charles Atlas, which resembled the large windows at the back of the hall and the black beams that extend vertically from floor to ceiling.

Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec

17 Screens
The 17 Screens collection of partitions is the result of a year of research and development by the pair, and brings together traditional craft methods with technology such as 3D printing. The duo worked with French ceramic craftsmen, as well as tile brand Rombina and glass specialist Glas Italia. The pieces are based on line drawings by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, and partly inspired by Ronan’s visits to Bretagne to observe natural shapes and formations – including trees, mildew, and plants.

Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin

formafantasma
flos

Italian designers Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin make up Amsterdam-based studio Formafantasma. Trimarchi and Farresin met while studying in Florence. They later studied a masters degree at Design Academy Eindhoven, setting up Formafantasma after graduating in 2009. The studio explores issues such as the relationship between tradition and local culture, the significance of objects as cultural conduits, and adopts critical approaches to sustainability.

TONY MATELLI

ТОНИ МАТЕЛЛИ
Tony Matelli is one of several artists who have become known for reinterpreting the tradition of hyperrealism in American sculpture. During recent years he has moved away from his earlier depictions of humans and animals towards examining signs of human presence. Using an often hyperrealistic idiom, Matelli describes the more disquieting sides of human beings and human society. His sculptures straddle the boundary between uneasiness and humour: in a number of the works he turns innocence into absurdity, such as when animals or humans are maltreated by various weapons and devices. He was born 1971 in Chicago, IL and lives and works in New York, New York.

James Webb

Untitled (Al Madat)
A recording of a Sufi dhikr undertaken by patients at the Sultan Bahu Rehab Centre in Westridge, Mitchell’s Plain. Dhikr (literally, “remembrance”) is a traditional Islamic recitation, where sacred names are chanted with special breathing techniques, often creating trance-like effects. This practice was brought to the Cape with the Malay slaves, and is now used by the rehabilitation centre as an augmentation to the curative process. “Al Madat,” the specific dhikr used for this installation, translates as “help,” and is here used to implore the Prophet for assistance.

MIAO XIAOCHUN

МЯО СЯОЧУНЬ
缪晓春
مياو شياو تشون

The large-scale nine-panel installation, Microcosm, is based on Hieronymus Bosch’s 15th century masterpiece, The Garden of Earthly Delights. Microcosm is an imaginative reinvention of the sumptuous landscape of sin, salvation, and tawdry visions of those who never made it to paradise. The structure and narrative pattern of Bosch’s triptych, such as the architecture of heaven, earth and hell, as well as the basic forms of Bosch’s pictures, have been preserved in Miao Xiaochun’s work. But new digital means and computer technologies have allowed Miao Xiaochun to explore a contemporary visual vocabulary. He abolishes the traditional fixed single-point perspective aesthetic, instead favoring the Chinese tradition of multiple points of view in a single landscape.

IRIS VAN HERPEN

Айрис Ван Эрпен
イリス ヴァン ヘルペン

Iris van Herpen is a Dutch fashion designer who is widely recognized as one of fashion’s most talented and forward-thinking creators who continuously pushes the boundaries of fashion design. Since her first show in 2007 van Herpen has been preoccupied with inventing new forms and methods of sartorial expression by combining the most traditional and the most radical materials and garment construction methods into her unique aesthetic vision.

thomas mailaender

Nude Museum
Thomas Mailaender (born 1979) is a French artist living and working between Paris and Marseille known for his use of a wide range of media and his experimentation with printing processes, fixing strange and humorous found imagery onto the surface of ceramics, photography and sculpture. The resulting objects teem with curiosity and a sense of the bizarre, pairing traditional, historical techniques with today’s prolific digital visual culture.

RICHARD DUPONT

理查德·杜邦
리처드 듀퐁

Manipulating 3-D scans of his own body on the computer, Mr. Dupont then marries digital fabrication methods like rapid prototyping and computer numerically controlled milling with traditional plaster casting and other laborious hand work to make figures that can appear both archaic and futuristic. One of his standing nudes, similar in posture to the Kouros statues from ancient Greece, appears to melt into ripples when viewed on one axis, suggesting the psychic experience of man in the modern world.

Noa Raviv

Noa is fascinated by the tension between harmony and chaos, tradition and innovation, sensitively seeking for the perfect balance. She likes to observe and look for the uniqueness and beauty in the mundane and ordinary. uniqueness and beauty in the mundane and ordinary.

MARIE HUDELOT

“I made this series with the desire to build a set of symbolic portraits inspired by my background of double cultures. I’m French with Middle Eastern origins. I worked by using the pictorial tradition of still lives. I chose to put forward characters where the nature and objects they carry come from different rites and customs.”

alexandra zierle and paul carter

Absent Engagement
Alexandra Zierle (DE) and Paul Carter’s (UK) collaborative work is Interdisciplinary, multi-sensory and often site/context responsive, spanning performance, happenings and interventions, sound, video and installation. Through their collaborative practice, Zierle & Carter critically examine different modes of communication and what it means to be human, addressing notions of belonging, dynamics within relationships, and the transformation of limitations. Their work sites an embodied investigation into human interactions and encounters, acting as an invitation to venture into the spaces in-between the external and internal, permanent and transient, spoken and unheard. The work fundamentally explores society’s conventions, traditions, and rituals, often flipping them on their head, reversing orders, and disrupting the norm.

Qi Hu

Reflection
REFLECTION is a collaborative project with “Printemps Homme” in Paris, inspired from Chinese ancient gardians, such as lions, dragons and Kylins. The image of these powerful creatures brings some traditional elements while creating some taste of future.

REIN VOLLENGA

The artist Rein Vollenga is known for his highly visceral sculptures that show a fascination for the human body merged with a synthetic aesthetic. These opposites are reflected in his technique of combining found generic objects with traditionally hand-sculpted material, the craftsmanship being in stark contradiction to the sleek high gloss surfaces of the finished work. Vollenga’s sculptures have been exhibited in both museums and galleries.

Brigitte Niedermair

女权艺术家 摄影作品
THE SCOPE Be more flexible!

Originaire du Sud du Tyrol, Brigitte Niedermair déploie dès son adolescence son énergie créatrice : peinture et dessin en sont les premiers signes– elle se lance à vingt ans dans la photographie. développe sa pratique des portraits féminins. […] A travers commandes et travaux personnels se pose la question de la condition féminine. Interrogeant traditions, religions et modernité, en les articulant à des sujets tels que l’avortement et l’insémination artificielle, elle propose une vision duelle, entre sacré et profane, ascétisme et érotisme  et émancipation.

Geoffrey Drake-Brockman

The Coppelia Project
via highlike submit

The Coppelia Project is inspired by the story about a clockwork girl from the 1870 ballet ‘Coppelia’ by Saint-Léon, Nuitter, and Delibes, based on a story by Hoffmann. It also draws the commonplace metaphor of clockwork music boxes, with the little ballerinas that pop up and rotate in front of a mirror when you open the lid. Coppelia is part of the traditional classical ballet repertoire and is performed frequently by ballet companies around the world. It belongs to a small group of enduring stories in Western Culture that directly address the limits of humanity when confronted by our creations. The Coppelia story is unusual in approaching this theme through love and attraction, rather than horror and revulsion, as emphasised by Mary Shelly in ‘Frankenstein’. The Coppelia story deals with some of the issues at the edge of humanity; machines interchangeable with persons, love and attraction confused at this boundary.

Gaetano Pesce

UP-5 Chair
Geatano Pesce, au crépuscule de sa carrière, peut affirmer qu’il a bousculé l’histoire du design et plus particulièrement la façon de le concevoir. Il a affirmé très tôt l’idée selon laquelle le design doit dépasser la notion d’utilité pour devenir un objet de questionnement. Ainsi, en 1969, le designer conçoit son œuvre peut-être la plus emblématique, le Fauteuil UP5 Donna ou Chair Up Dressed. Ce fauteuil, aux formes évocatrices est une ode à la féminité… emprisonnée et sous le joug de la domination masculine. Une assise très confortable et profonde pour se lover dedans, complétée par un pouf lui-même retenu au fauteuil par une chaîne. Selon le maître italien : « Cette réalisation m’a permis d’exprimer ma vision de la femme. Toujours sédentaire, elle reste malgré elle prisonnière d’elle-même. La forme de ce fauteuil, évoquant les formes généreuses d’une femme, retenue par un boulet au pied, m’a permis de renvoyer à l’image traditionnelle du prisonnier ».