François Vogel

Erebeta
« Erebeta » drives us on a vertical jump above the city. We ricochet on the pavement, twirl around the buildings and pass through streets. This bouncing point of view on modern Japan is accompanied by the traditional Kuroda Bushi music.

PETER MOVRIN

“Movrin’s main inspiration has always been his childhood, where tradition, God and meat were the subject of everyday life. As an only son of a butcher in a small Slovenian town, surrounded by woods and bears, his growing up marked him with a roughness that he transcends in his designs with a special kind of romanticism. In this hard provincial life meat became his medium of expression, as a child he would carve steaks in a way that would appeal to his bewildered eye. There were, however, also fresh issues of Vogue magazines in the house, brought from trips to Trieste, that stirred up his imagination.” Black Sheep

mode:Niko Riam

One Life Remains: André Berlemont, Kevin Lesur, Brice Roy & Franck Weber

FILE SAO PAULO 2017
LES DISCIPLINES DU RECTANGLE
Inspired by Michel Foucault’s work, Les disciplines du rectangle is a videogame proposition about the nature of rules and norms at the digital age. If society provides models of accomplishment we are supposed to fit inside, then the rectangle is the pure abstraction of this idea. The geometrical shape works as a symbol of the very nature of normativity, blind to individual differences. The rectangle, existing only on the screen, reveals how digital technologies can in some ways become the new location for this normativity and the ambivalent results of their intangible and invisible nature. Besides, the installation offers an occasion to think about the way games can become manipulation tools. The fact that in the end, players act as if they were piloted by the rectangle (an inversion of the traditional relationship between player and avatar) gives an aesthetical highlight to this.

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Inspirado en el trabajo de Michel Foucault, Les disciplines du rectangle es una propuesta de videojuego sobre la naturaleza de las reglas y normas en la era digital. Si la sociedad proporciona modelos de realización en los que se supone que encajamos, entonces el rectángulo es la pura abstracción de esta idea. La forma geométrica funciona como símbolo de la naturaleza misma de la normatividad, ciega a las diferencias individuales. El rectángulo, que existe solo en la pantalla, revela cómo las tecnologías digitales pueden convertirse de alguna manera en la nueva ubicación de esta normatividad y los resultados ambivalentes de su naturaleza intangible e invisible. Además, la instalación ofrece la oportunidad de pensar en cómo los juegos pueden convertirse en herramientas de manipulación. El hecho de que, al final, los jugadores actúen como si fueran piloteados por el rectángulo (una inversión de la relación tradicional entre jugador y avatar) le da un toque estético a esto.

 

YOICHI YAMAMOTO

Japanese firm yoichi yamamoto architects has completed ‘2D/3D chairs’ for tokyo fashion labels issey miyake store. featuring a series of traditional dining chairs, the installation transforms from a two dimensional graphic into a tangible piece. The perspective is manipulated creating a unique appearance from different vantage points for onlookers. graphics of legs in varying perspectives are printed onto a horizontal plane while the chair backs rest upon the surface. The seat backs maintain a seamless transition from the graphics by utilizing assorted sizes, heights and placed at diverse angles.

David Rabinowitch

“6 Sided Plane in 5 Masses and 3 Scales with 2 Free Regions
The drawings also clarify the schema underlying the locations of the bored holes in the sculptures. Situated along lines linking vertices at the perimeter of the forms, they recall constellation maps or, as with 8 Sided Plane in 7 Masses and 2 Scales with Free Region (1975/2018), the plans of Romanesque cathedrals. Here, again, the relationship is inverted. The black shapes representing the solid stone columns in the plans echo the shafts of air bored through the steel. The term “Romanesque” appears frequently in Rabinowitch’s titles. Though absent here, the conglomeration of shapes visible in Romanesque church plans, like those of Cluny in France, bear an affinity with the additive sensibility evident in Rabinowitch’s structures. Donald Kuspit has focused attention on the artist’s interest in Northwest Coast traditions, especially the totem pole. Like the totem pole, Rabinowitch’s works manifest a “disrupted continuum,” a whole built out of distinct parts. For me, the presence of the drawings in this exhibition subtly undermined that assertion. The lines along which the bored holes are situated form a network that passes over all (or at least most) of the components in each work, in effect linking them. Though no longer visible in the steel versions, the connective links act as a reminder of this second related principle of organization. Some may see it as a complication, a discrepancy, or be disappointed by the realization, but I think it helps demystify these “new” early sculptures. At the same time, the proximity of the studies by no means diminished the deep-rooted and intriguing complexity of Rabinowitch’s sculptural work.”John Gayer

Daniel Widrig

‘SnP’, 2018, recycled plastic, injection moulded

“Widrig’s art breaks down the boundaries between disciplines; borrowing tools traditionally associated with one industry and using them in other fields, in often unanticipated and exciting ways. Widrig uses computer simulation processes and advanced technologies adopted from the special effects business to create sculptural 3D-printed craftwork—digital designs materialize into intricate sculptures in glass or recycled plastic and furniture pieces with impeccable undulated thin surfaces,” Devid Gualandris

Anders Lind and Ulla Karlsson

Skogen/The forest
Skogen/The forest is an interactive sound art exhibition created by Swedish composer Anders Lind in collaboration with Swedish scenographer Ulla Karlsson. THE FOREST is created as a multiplayer orchestra platform for novices (or experts). Within THE FOREST the visitors becomes orchestra performers ready to explore preprocessed sounds from the Swedish forest in combination with sounds from a traditional symphony orchestra. THE FOREST was first exhibited at Norrlandsoperan, Umeå, Sweden in 2019.

SAM TAYLOR WOOD

a little death

Despite the broader reference to the traditional pictorial genre of “still life”, disseminated from the Dutch and Spanish painters of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, ‘Still life’ from 2001 and ‘A little death’ from 2002 refer especially to the painting of transient elements of the French Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin (1699-1779) to discuss the distortion and inexorability of time, the finitude of life or, above all, the interdependence between life and death. The title makes a direct reference to the expression with which the French philosopher Georges Bataille defined the orgasm: ‘une petite mort‘.

Oli Sorenson

LA SOCIETE DE LA PLACE DES SPECTACLES
FILE SAO PAULO 2015
Inspired from the live works of Italian artist Michelangelo Pistoletto (1933-) of meticulously ransacking large mirrors, Sorenson revisited the classical traditions of vanitas under the materiality of video, and generate his creative process from the destruction of consumer components.

MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY

マイケル·クラーク·カンパニー
Tate Project Part I ]

The choreography rehearsed and performed in 2010 paired the rigour of classical steps with contemporary movement, a juxtaposition that paralleled Clark’s training as a ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet, and his later anti-hierarchical, anti-authoritarian choreographic experiments. Balletic poses, jumps and steps were isolated from traditional narrative sequences and made strange through repetition. The graceful leaps and turns of the trained dancers seemed awkward and uneven, just as they were often out of sync and oriented in different directions. This choreography paralleled the performance space, which was demarcated by geometric and striped floor mats designed by Charles Atlas, which resembled the large windows at the back of the hall and the black beams that extend vertically from floor to ceiling.

Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin

formafantasma
flos

Italian designers Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin make up Amsterdam-based studio Formafantasma. Trimarchi and Farresin met while studying in Florence. They later studied a masters degree at Design Academy Eindhoven, setting up Formafantasma after graduating in 2009. The studio explores issues such as the relationship between tradition and local culture, the significance of objects as cultural conduits, and adopts critical approaches to sustainability.

IRIS VAN HERPEN

Айрис Ван Эрпен
イリス ヴァン ヘルペン

Iris van Herpen is a Dutch fashion designer who is widely recognized as one of fashion’s most talented and forward-thinking creators who continuously pushes the boundaries of fashion design. Since her first show in 2007 van Herpen has been preoccupied with inventing new forms and methods of sartorial expression by combining the most traditional and the most radical materials and garment construction methods into her unique aesthetic vision.

Pauline Van Dongen

Pauline van Dongen researches the body in a technologically textured space. After graduating from ArtEZ, Academy of the Arts in Arnhem, the Netherlands, she started her own womenswear label in 2010. Pauline operates a meticulous research of the behaviour of experimental and high-tech materials, combining new technologies with traditional techniques to constantly renovate craftsmanship. Working closely with companies from the field of science and innovation, Pauline aims to merge fashion and technology giving life to scientific creations.

OLI SORENSON

video pistoletto
FILE SAO PAULO 2015

Inspired from the live works of Italian artist Michelangelo Pistoletto (1933-) of meticulously ransacking large mirrors, Sorenson revisited the classical traditions of vanitas under new materials together with one of the more celebrated exploits of Arte Povera.

Aranda\Lasch

阿兰达\拉希
アランダ\ラッシュ
Primitives

Primitives is an installation that combines the romantic tradition of ruined landscapes with modular fractals. First realized across the entry of the Venice Biennale in 2010, it is comprised of loosely dispersed furniture elements that appear like rock piles, each one unique but formed from the same universal building block. Like microcosms in the distance, the clusters are imagined as islands falling apart and building back up, organizing and eroding at once.

Jason Middlebrook

Джейсон Миддлбрук
Falling Water

[…] Middlebrook’s work consistently references art-historical traditions, styles, and movements. For instance, his sculptures crafted from hardwood planks, which he began in 2008 after relocating from New York City to Hudson, New York, feature painted abstractions. They are collisions of nature, art-making, and history that exemplify the artist’s approach.

PAULINE VAN DONGEN

wearable solar

There is nothing natural in nature; technology makes our humanness giving form to our surroundings. The human habitat reveals a techno-morphed structure that can no longer be hidden behind the vestiges of a natural world: technology has to be naturalized. Pauline van Dongen researches the body in a technologically textured space. After graduating from ArtEZ, Academy of the Arts in Arnhem, the Netherlands, she started her own womenswear label in 2010. Pauline operates a meticulous research of the behaviour of experimental and high-tech materials, combining new technologies with traditional techniques to constantly renovate craftsmanship. Working closely with companies from the field of science and innovation, Pauline aims to merge fashion and technology giving life to scientific creations.

KONRAD SMOLEŃSKI

Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More

Konrad Smoleński represents Poland at the Venice Art Biennale 2013. His monumental installation in the Polish Pavilion in the Biennale’s Giardini is titled Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More. The work is a continuation of the previous explorations of Konrad Smoleński, who focuses his interest on sound. Two church bells that have been cast especially for this exhibition are at the center of the installation. Two walls of loudspeakers and other elements complete the work. In regular intervals, the traditional bronze bells, full-range speakers and other sonorous objects play a symphony. The create both a visual and aural experience, where the delaying and modifying of the initial sound of the bell is important. The exhibition Konrad Smoleński: Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More is curated by Daniel Muzyczuk and Agnieszka Pindera.
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KAZUHIRO KOJIMA

moon tensegrity membrane structure

This is an experimental housing complex that sought to regenerate the shops-cum-houses in an old area of Hanoi, Vietnam. This district, popularly known as “the 36th street district”, is composed primarily of houses inhabited by traditionally large Chinese families. The buildings have narrow frontages and an unusually extended depth of 70-80 m. These high-density, low-rise buildings were considered to be a comfortable domestic environment until the changes of government in Vietnam during the 20th century.
Han,” became such a high-density city (1,000 people per hectare} that many families began to live together within one unit and even to transform courtyards into actual rooms. As a result the standard of living deteriorated.

CINESTEIKA

Dina Khuseyn, Patrick K.-H., Oleg Makarov

A multivarious result of visual representation of 3 non-identical structures (dance performance, sound art and animation) points at interactivity as the main possible axis of reference. Necessity of this axis derives from specific interpretations that can only appear by juxtaposing of several systems. It opposes to traditional “parallelism” of media, employed in theater that only imitates causality, but having it already done before performance is starting.
In Cinestetika, each element of each media works as separate PROCESS, but also serves a SIGNAL to other medias. This essential core makes Cinestetika rather an instrument to make a term “live performance” filled with its perfect sense.

Ateliers Jean Nouvel

努维尔
جان نوفيل
ז’אן נובל
ジャン·ヌーヴェル
Жан Нувель
장 누벨
Serpentine Pavilion

The design contrasted lightweight materials with dramatic metal cantilevered structures, rendered in a vivid red that, in a play of opposites, contrasts with the green of its park setting. In London, the colour reflects the iconic British images of traditional telephone boxes, postboxes and London buses. The building consists of bold geometric forms, large retractable awnings and a sloped freestanding wall that stands 12m above the lawn.
Striking glass, polycarbonate and fabric structures create a versatile system of interior and exterior spaces, while the flexible auditorium accommodates the changing summer weather and Park Nights, the Serpentine’s acclaimed programme of public talks and events, which attracts up to 250,000 visitors each summer.
Nouvel’s Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, the architect’s first completed building in the UK, operates as a publicly accessible structure within Kensington Gardens and as a café. The pavilion design highlights the idea of play with its incorporation of traditional French outdoor table-tennis tables.
This 2010 Pavilion is the tenth commission in the gallery’s annual series, the world’s first and most ambitious architectural programme of its kind, which has become an international site for architectural experimentation and follows a long tradition of pavilions by some of the world’s greatest architects. The immediacy of the commission – a maximum of six months from invitation to completion – provides a unique model worldwide.

ART ORIENTE OBJET MARION LAVAL-JEANTET AND BENOIT MANGIN

Felinanthropy

Die ökologischen Anliegen von art oriente objet führten zu Kunst, die offenbar eng mit einer Handwerkstradition verbunden ist, in der Recycling und Wiederverwendung wichtig sind. Ihre Verwendung von recycelten Materialien verleiht ihrer Kunst einen Aspekt des meisterhaften Bastelns. Tatsächlich erstrecken sich ihre Vorstellungen von Recycling auch auf bereits etablierte Ideen, die sie von Beginn ihrer Zusammenarbeit an als bereitwillig definiert haben. Ihre Arbeit in Bezug auf Biotechnologie hat ihnen einen Platz in der BioArt-Bewegung eingebracht (Jens Hauser, Le Lieu Unique, 2004) und sie werden oft zu den Künstlern an der Grenze zwischen Kunst und Wissenschaft gezählt. Darüber hinaus können sie als Künstler des sozialen Beobachters oder als Künstler des Anthropologen betrachtet werden, die das Experimentieren mit Systemen fördern, die sie formal analysieren. Darüber hinaus ist Marion Laval-Jeantet als professionelle Praktikerin für Ethnologie und Psychologie mit diesen Problemen konfrontiert. Ihre Vorgehensweise besteht darin, Lebenserfahrungen aus einem direkten Eintauchen in ein Erfahrungsfeld zu gewinnen, auf dem sie die Schaffung einer übertragbaren Vision und eines aktiven Objekts aufbauen.