Studio Drift

Concrete Storm
On first impression, visitors experience solid forms, which draw on minimalist motifs and underscore the stable properties of concrete. While wearing the HoloLens, viewers enter a mixed reality, enlivened by responsive holograms that augment the physical environment of the installation. With Concrete Storm, DRIFT explores the layer between the parallel worlds, whereby the real and the virtual worlds co-exist. People’s attention is now constantly divided between these two worlds in which they coexist. The artists believe that combining these two seemingly separate worlds they can study the unlimited possibilities of the unstoppable evolution. Concrete Storm expands the boundaries of the digital world, freed from screens, and integrated into the fabric of physical existence.

LETHA WILSON

Wall in Blue Ash Tree

“I think that nature as a subject is often seen as something outdated or cliché in contemporary art and especially in nature photos. But I think there is still a lot of scope to play and push the boundaries, “Letha Wilson said. She thus dust off the subject through installations, videos and photo-sculptures and breathe new life into the gallery.
Using photography as a material in its own right, she shakes up conventions and does not hesitate to manipulate her photographs and associate them with other elements such as wood, paint, light or more recently, concrete, giving them a new dimension. One way for her to suggest that the viewer question the desire to be elsewhere and the representation of nature. Letha plays on the fragile balance that exists between the beauty of her images and their sculptural strength and thus creates relationships between nature, objects, exhibition space and wild landscapes. »Géraldyne Masson.

Marshmallow Laser Feast

NEST

Inspired by Homer’s Odyssey
Loosely based on Homer’s The Odyssey, Marshmallow Laser Feast’s light installation lit the primary performance space within the chapel’s hazy internal dome. Grid-like projections crossed with mobile structures (designed by the architectural practice Studio Weave) as agile bodies crept over, in and through the many lit towers and surfaces. This first act was seen by the audience from the left and right balconies above. The second act, down flights of rope-lined staircases in the concrete basement, was more disorienting, lit only with triangular neon tubing and an eerie glow that seeped from an open door. The style of dance, in keeping with the more rapid and percussive score, by Canadian composer Christopher Mayo and electronic music composer / performer Anna Meredith, confronted the audience and was staged without boundaries dividing the dancers (some of whom were in street clothes) and viewers.

Regine Schumann

colormirror dornbirn
Regine Schumann is a minimalist artist who works with Light Art, initially inspired by Color Field Painting and artists as Mark Rothko, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin. Schumann’s boxes and installations are made of acrylic colour plates especially produced for her. Her work is more than just Concrete Art. Conceptualized as emotive spaces, Schumann’s colour– lled light rooms provoke intense feelings of something otherworldly. Her minimalistic approach affects everything from her choice of materials to the way she plays with form and colour.

Andreas Lutz

Binary Supremacy
Binary Supremacy is the continuation of Lutz´s previous album Zwölftonform from 2016. The initial investigation and visualisation of abstract sounds now led to a more concrete, rhythmic and narrating soundscape.

South Georgia Heritage

NEON – Fantastical Architecture, Art and Design

FROM DARKNESS TO LIGHT
South Georgia Heritage Trust launched an open call for a site-specific commission to be located on Grytviken the former whaling station of sub-Antarctic Island of South Georgia. The project was required to celebrate the whale through a reinterpretation of the former Flensing Plan (a large timber deck used to process the captured whales) and offer a message of hope for future generations by demonstrating how humankind can move from exploitation to conservation. Our proposal imagines that the deck of the Flensing plan has been cut like a piece of flesh from the ground and bent upwards to form an arc. The timber deck is replaced with concrete pavers which are coloured based on the activities which took place in the sites past and present (whale processing and whale watching). The coloured pavers are positioned to create a gradient which provides the visitor with a visual representation of the way the site has changed over time.

Ai-Spacefactory

Marsha
Marsha is a AI SpaceFactory’s NASA-award-winning design and prototype for a 3D printed Mars habitat. The prototype was printed nearly autonomously in 2019 within a 30-hour construction window. “Our 3D print technology uses a recyclable biopolymer composite which outperformed concrete in NASA’s strength, durability, and crush testing. ASTM lab tested and certified to be two to three times stronger than concrete in compression, our space-grade material is also five times more durable than concrete in freeze-thaw conditions.” Ai-Spacefactory

Nicole Zisman

I frequently entertain the idea that everything we perceive might actually not be real at all, that the world around me could actually just be my senses lying to me. The idea that “reality is a hoax” completely freaks me out, so naturally it became the concrete starting point for my collection. From this, I began to develop different ways of “imagining” garments, of finding ways of putting things that are not really there into existence. I wanted to blur the lines of real versus imagined//artificial. Print was the best facilitator of this goal.

JKMM

Amos Rex Museum
Amos Rex rethinks the urban park as part of our museum experience. Its structure is built with large concrete domes. This principle is very functional for museum use: it allows long column-free spans and flexible exhibition spaces. The domes contain skylights that introduce natural light into the galleries below as well as carefully selected views of life above. At street level, a new urban square has been created with a unique identity. The domes form an undulating landscape for people to enjoy, especially children. The Lasipalatsi building was restored respecting its valuable 1930´s Functionalist era interiors and details.

Skylar Tibbits

Rock Print
The world has been “about to be revolutionized” by 3D printing for years now, but aside from rapid prototyping, 3D selfies, and the occasional gimmicky 3D-printed house, we don’t see much of it every day. So why hasn’t this technology revolutionized modern infrastructure? One reason is that it still has to compete with concrete, one of the cheapest, most versatile, and efficiently delivered materials in the history of architecture. At the Chicago Architecture Biennial, Self-Assembly Lab at MIT and Gramazio Kohler Research of ETH Zurich showed off a process that might finally one-up concrete, using only a 3D printing extruder, rocks, string, and smart design.

Frank Gehry

Luma Arles Tower
Atelier Vincent Hecht’s photos reveal the distinctive facade of the Luma Arles tower, which is finished with 11,000 aluminium panels irregularly arranged around its concrete and steel frame. Described by architecture critic Frank Miller as a “stainless-steel tornado”, the cladding was designed by Gehry to evoke the craggy limestone cliffs around the city for which it is known.

Quintessenz

Lingering Summer
“Lingering Summer” is a site-specific installation created for the 2019 West Bund Art Fair. The gradation of colors from yellow to lime green, and indigo to cerulean blue, is reminiscent of the dynamics of changing colors from early to mid-summer. The ascending and descending of layers create a natural and comforting rhythm, as if forming a virtual space to preserve the summer scene inside the steel and concrete architecture, mesmerizing the audience by breaking them away from reality.

Andrew Kudless

p_ball
This project investigates the self-organization of two materials, plaster and elastic fabric, to produce evocative visual and acoustic effects. Inspired by the work of the Spanish architect Miguel Fisac and his experiments with flexible concrete formwork in the 1960-70s, p_wall attempts to continue this line of research and add to it the ability to generate larger and more differentiated patterns. Starting from an image, a cloud of points is generated based on the image’s grayscale values.

Timm Ulrichs

ТИММ УЛЬРИХС
Timm Ulrichs (born 1940) is considered one of the most influential German conceptual and action artists. He writes concrete poetry, makes performance art, and works as a sculptor. Generally typical for Timm Ulrichs’ heterogeneous oeuvre is that his works take up the topics and concerns of their time, but address them in such a way that they remain remarkably relevant even today. In his works, he often anticipates artistic trends that establish themselves much later, and he has introduced various innovative approaches, themes, and concepts.

DOUG AITKEN

ダグエイケン
道格·艾特肯
sonic fountain

A large round hole—if it were a hot tub, it would be comfortably orgy-sized—has been gouged roughly out of the slick concrete floor of 303 Gallery and filled with milky gray water. Attached to the black duct-work and girders of the ceiling directly above it is a square of pipe surrounded by a speaker array. In the center of the square and at each of its corners is a computer-controlled spigot, dripping, spitting or jetting out, in a rhythmically complex 15-minute cycle, milky water pumped up from the pit in a closed circuit. This is Doug Aitken’s Sonic Fountain.

Lina Ghotmeh

Light in Water Installation
‘Light in Water’ is a site-specific installation intended to provide an immersive and emotional experience. It was previously presented at Milan Design Week 2011. The installation took advantage of the unique status of the venue – one of the oldest concrete domes in Paris. The installation was thus adapted to the circular form of the space, defining the inner sanctuary as a ‘place to be’ and an outer area as a space for a bystander. There are sixteen rings of slotted tubes on the ceiling. From each hole, 60 drops of water fall every minute; in total 3 tons of water circulate in the space. The LED lights vibrate between on and off, with frequencies ranging from the shortest interval possible, at 7μs, allowing the viewer to materialise a point of light in water, up to 6000μs, where light becomes the line of water.

SANJAY PURI ARCHITECTS

bombay arts society
sanjay puri architects have designed ‘bombay arts society’ as a mixed-use building on a 1,300 square meter plot. half the complex’s programs is composed of office spaces, while the other half caters to visual and performance arts displays and creative studio space. three lower levels encased in an undulating concrete form house galleries and their allied functions, the seamless transitions between vertical and horizontal surfaces continuing inside the building as well as on the exterior. thus, patrons tour the museum, moving fluidly through an occupiable sculpture. slightly detached from the public realm below, a four-storey volume contains the arts society’s administrative offices.

MARTIN BOYCE

Бойс, Мартин
马丁•博伊斯
마틴 보이스
מרטין בויס
マーティン・ボイス
Do Words Have Voices

Since 2005, Boyce’s work has drawn largely from an encounter with Four Concrete Trees, a group of sculptural pieces by the Martel Brothers made in 1925. Five years on, and Boyce’s work is an increasingly abstractive and virally pervasive aggregator, a lens through which everything must be seen. Like a strongly held belief or an indisputable fact, this is the world as infinite and varied as it ever was, just with one of the basic settings tweaked.

MIKE NELSON

迈克·尼尔森
Mike Nelson (b. 1967) is one of the most appreciated artists of his generation. His work predominantly features sculpture and meticulously constructed, large-scale architectural installations. In this new work created for Malmö Konsthall, Nelson uses the institutional architecture as a backdrop for a massive concrete workshop. The exhibition space is divided by a glass wall into two spaces; a smaller production workshop and an exhibition space stripped back to its original configuration.

TOYO ITO

تويو ايتو
伊东丰雄
טויו איטו
伊東豊雄
도요 이토
Tower of Winds
During the day the perforated metal panels that cover the Tower of Winds reflect the city image and make the design appear humble and simple. But during the night, it gets lit up in an ever-changing combination of light intensity and colors. Using computer software, the lighting follows the wind speed and noise levels changing the Tower’s appearance accordingly. The Tower of Winds features more than 1300 light bulbs and 42 flood lights and neon rings (on each floor). The small lights change their colors according to the wind’s noise level and the rings change their intensity according to its speed.
Basically, the Tower of the Winds by Toyo Ito is a wind indicator in a constant relationship with the city and the natural environment, a junction between the two. It is placed at the train station area, welcoming the passengers arriving in Yokohama and its functional role is accommodating another natural element. Surprisingly the Tower of Winds houses the water tanks for the air-conditioning system of the underground mall below. The Tower is not a new construction, but a re-designing of an old concrete tower that already existed there since the ‘60s.