ISSEY MIYAKE

ايسي مياكي
איסי מיקים
イッセイミヤケ
이세이 미야케
HOMME PLISSÉ

Im Zentrum von Miyakes Philosophie der Kleidung steht die Idee, ein Kleidungsstück aus einem Stück Stoff zu kreieren. und die Erforschung des Raumes zwischen dem menschlichen Körper und dem Gewebe, das ihn bedeckt. Sein Fokus auf Design war immer, ein ausgewogenes Verhältnis zwischen Tradition und Innovation aufrechtzuerhalten: handgefertigte und neue Technologie. FOLDING BITTE wurde 1993 geboren und ist eine radikale, aber äußerst praktische Form zeitgenössischer Kleidung: Sie kombiniert eine alte Idee, eine dreidimensionale Figur mit zweidimensionalem Material unter Verwendung von Falten zu verbinden, mit neuer Technologie, Funktionalität und Schönheit . 1998 kehrte Miyake zu seiner ursprünglichen Liebe zur Forschung und Erforschung zurück und startete mit dem Mitarbeiter Dai Fujiwara ein neues Projekt namens A-POC (One Piece of Fabric). Durch die Erforschung der Möglichkeiten zwischen Kreativität und digitaler Technologie hinterfragt Miyake die traditionellen Methoden, mit denen wir Dinge tun.

FABRICA

Anerkennung
Recognition, Gewinner des IK-Preises 2016 für digitale Innovation, ist ein Programm für künstliche Intelligenz, das aktuellen Fotojournalismus mit britischer Kunst aus der Tate-Sammlung vergleicht. In drei Monaten vom 2. September bis 27. November wird Recognition eine ständig wachsende virtuelle Galerie schaffen: eine Zeitkapsel der Welt, die in verschiedenen Arten von Bildern aus Vergangenheit und Gegenwart dargestellt wird. Eine Ausstellung in der Tate Britain begleitet das Online-Projekt und bietet Besuchern die Möglichkeit um den Auswahlprozess der Maschine zu unterbrechen. Die Ergebnisse dieses Experiments – um zu sehen, ob eine künstliche Intelligenz aus den vielen persönlichen Reaktionen lernen kann, die Menschen beim Betrachten von Bildern haben – werden am Ende des Projekts auf dieser Website vorgestellt. Recognition ist ein Projekt von Fabrica für Tate; in Partnerschaft mit Microsoft, Inhaltsanbieter Reuters, Algorithmus für künstliche Intelligenz von Jolibrain.

PHILIP BEESLEY

Mäander
Meander ist eine großflächige immersive Testumgebung, die in einem historischen Lagergebäude im Zentrum einer Wohnhochhaussiedlung in Cambridge, Ontario, errichtet wurde. Die Netzgerüste, aus denen das Testfeld besteht, sind als eine Reihe von Arten innerhalb eines künstlichen Ökosystems organisiert, die sich sanft biegen und auf die Bewegung der Betrachter reagieren. Ähnlich wie in natürlichen Umgebungen wie Flüssen und Wolken leiten große Gruppen von Teilen physikalische Impulse und Datensignale hin und her, sodass die gesamte Umgebung als zusammenhängendes Ganzes arbeiten kann. Die Innovationen in Meander schlagen Wege vor, um adaptive, sensible Gebäude der Zukunft zu schaffen.

Jeanne Gang

American Museum of Natural History
Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation
“We uncovered a way to vastly improve visitor circulation and museum functionality, while tapping into the desire for exploration and discovery that is so emblematic of science and also such a big part of being human. Upon entering the space, natural daylight from above and sight lines to various activities inside invite movement through the Central Exhibition Hall on a journey toward deeper understanding. The architectural design grew out of the museum’s mission.” Jeanne Gang

Studio Roosegaarde

Grow
Daan Roosegaarde’s latest artwork GROW is an homage to the beauty of agriculture. In the world film premiere GROW appears as a luminous dreamscape of red and blue waves of light over an enormous field. GROW is inspired by scientific light recipes which improve plants’ growth and resilience. Most of the time we hardly notice the huge areas of the Earth which are literally feeding us. GROW highlights the importance of innovation in the agriculture system: How can cutting-edge light design help plants to grow more sustainably? How can we make the farmer the hero?

Iart

Light Cloud
The Light Cloud at the Merck Innovation Center detects visitors’ movements in the room and translates them into many different moods. The generative sculpture stimulates and facilitates intense encounters between people and technology. The room-filling installation consists of four curved strands that are concentrically superimposed and slightly shifted in relation to each other. OLED elements that are attached to the strands and controlled by sensors react to the visitors’ movements and to sound compositions. In combination, this generates a complex mosaic in which sound and light interact playfully and the viewers leave traces.

CLIVE VAN HEERDEN AND JACK MAMA

Skin Sucka

A project conceived with Clive van Heerden, Jack Mama (Philips Design Probes) and Bart Hess, Skinsucka explores a vision of our nano technology future whereby bio technology and robotics come together to question our attitudes of a synthetic future. Skinsucka reveals a future where microbal robots live in our shared spaces and autonomously they will undertake menial tasks such as cleaning our homes by eating the dirt. ‘Skinsuckas’ clean the skin, removing the vestiges of make up and providing the remedies to combat the excesses of the night before They swarm over the body extruding metabolized household dirt, dressing the body in a daily ritual of real time, customized manufacture – yesterday’s discarded clothing ready for recycling.” Clive and Jack’s work has consistently brought very diverse skills together in new innovation processes. In the late 1990’s they took designers and other creative skills into Philips Research labs in the Redhill, London and New York and created a specialist studio in London to develop the skills, materials and technologies for a host of Wearable Electronic business propositions in the areas of electronic apparel, conductive textiles, physical gaming, medical monitoring and entertainment.

Zaha Hadid Architects

ShenZhen Science Technology Museum
A cascade of terraces will frame a large atrium at the heart of the Shenzhen Science & Technology Museum that Zaha Hadid Architects is developing in China. Slated for completion in late 2023, the pebble-shaped museum will encompass 125,000-square-metres and contain a mix of public spaces, galleries and educational facilities. It has been designed by Zaha Hadid Architects as a landmark for Shenzhen’s new Guangming Science City – a masterplan intended to establish the city as a hub for innovation.

fabrica

recognition
RECOGNITION

Recognition, winner of IK Prize 2016 for digital innovation, is an artificial intelligence program that compares up-to-the-minute photojournalism with British art from the Tate collection. Over three months from 2 September to 27 November, Recognition will create an ever-expanding virtual gallery: a time capsule of the world represented in diverse types of images, past and present.A display at Tate Britain accompanies the online project offering visitors the chance to interrupt the machine’s selection process. The results of this experiment – to see if an artificial intelligence can learn from the many personal responses humans have when looking at images – will be presented on this site at the end of the project.Recognition is a project by Fabrica for Tate; in partnership with Microsoft, content provider Reuters, artificial intelligence algorithm by Jolibrain.

Philip Beesley

Meander
Meander is a large-scale immersive testbed environment constructed within a historic warehouse building at the centre of a residential highrise development in Cambridge, Ontario. The meshwork scaffolds which comprise the testbed are organized as a series of species within an artificial ecosystem, gently flexing and responding to the movement of viewers. Similar to natural environments such as rivers and clouds, large groups of parts pass physical impulses and data signals back and forth, enabling the entire environment to work as an interconnected whole. The innovations in Meander suggest ways of making adaptive, sensitive buildings of the future.

Györök Bori

‘Polar’
Issu d’une nouvelle approche de la mode contemporaine, Bori Gyorok continuera de se concentrer sur l’expérimentation dans les limites de l’innovation et de l’esthétique.

Ani Liu

Untitled: (A Search for Ghosts in the Meat Machine)
What does it mean to be human? At first glance a simple question, the idea of being human is an unstable construct, continuously recrafted. Recent technological innovations allow us to redesign ourselves profoundly— from networked prosthetics and artificial intelligence, to the genetic code of life itself. Can our behaviors be reduced to algorithms? Can our bodies be upgraded with nonorganic integrations? Can sentience itself by manufactured in a lab? This set of nine sculptures examines personhood from anatomical, psychological, genetic, biochemical, behavioral, algorithmic, personal narrative and memory. In many ways, this installation is an emotional confrontation with being quantifiable.

Clouds Architecture Office

AVATAR X Lab
The project is a partnership between ANA Holdings Inc. and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA); a part of AVATAR X, a collaborative program for the advancement of space exploration and development. ANA and JAXA are both experts at launching vehicles into the atmosphere, the feeling of suspension or ‘being in the air’ is natural for both entities. The AVATAR X Lab Building is designed as a suspended building floating above a moon-like crater. The multi-story structure floats eighteen meters above the crater bottom, and is accessible by a bridge. When astronauts board a spacecraft they cross a bridge; when we board a plane we walk across a jet bridge between the terminal and airplane. This is our last contact with familiar ground before taking off for someplace new. The suspended building embodies this crossing of thresholds: after passing over the bridge you are transported to a new place, the AVATAR X Lab Building, where technological innovation will change how we see the world.

NOIZ

SHIBUYA HYPER CAST. 2
Shibuya Hyper CAST. 2 is a showcase of most cutting-edge urban innovations combined into one building. Shibuya CAST., an existing development designed by noiz, has been an urban lab of mixed function and culture located in the middle of one of the hottest areas in Tokyo. This hypothetical project has started for the 5-year memorial celebration of the CAST., to project future possibility of the building, the area, our society, and potentially a form of future city. It demonstrates how cities of the future could be structured and operated. The project is based on urban studies in the area of mobility, social welfare, administration, funding, security, sustainability and more. Shibuya Hyper CAST. 2 translates the best features of vibrant downtown districts into vertical language of ever-growing cities of the future.

Alex May and Anna Dumitriu

ArchaeaBot: A Post Climate Change, Post Singularity Life-form
“ArchaeaBot: A Post Singularity and Post Climate Change Life-form” takes the form of an underwater robotic installation that explores what ‘life’ might mean in a post singularity, post climate change  future. The project is based on new research about archaea (the oldest life forms on Earth) combined with the latest innovations in machine learning & artificial intelligence creating the ‘ultimate’ species for the end of the world as we know it.

BINA BAITEL

Pull over
French-israeli-swedish architect-designer bina baitel‘s lighting transcends the interaction between light and material, combining technological innovation with french handcraft. Her newest collection of lighting objects is commissioned and produced by nextlevel galerie in paris.‘Pull-over’: baitel’s previously designed ‘pull-over’ tactile luminaire is now also being produced by nextlevel gallery. The skin of the design is a variable luminous source thanks to its flexible nature – the light bulb, dimmer and lampshade are one.

Chris Burden

כריס ברדן
КРИС БЕРДЕН
Ode to Santos Dumont
Ode to Santos Dumont pays homage to ingenuity, optimism, and the persistence of experimentation, failure, and innovation. Inspired by Brazilian-born pioneer aviator Alberto Santos-Dumont, widely considered the father of aviation in France, the kinetic airship sculpture was recently completed after a decade of research and work by Burden.

Lionel Hun and Pixel n’Pepper

Black and White
Dedicated to the design and distribution of live shows combining the arts in all its forms, Compagnie Hybride offers a fusion of aesthetics. It is positioned at the crossroads of creativity where the bodies and new technology meet. Land on which confronts, body language and visual arts, in order to promote a work interdisciplinary research, choreography and artistic innovation. Through its creations, productions, performances, films, exhibitions, installations, educational workshops and event services, Compagnie Hybride, carried primarily by a desire to exchange, sharing, research and development, has a mandate to create and disseminate its designs in the artistic and cultural networks nationally and internationally.

satoru sugihara

A(g)ntense gallery installation
ATLV is a computational design firm based in los angeles, california. Founded by satoru sugihara, the studio pushes the boundaries of practice and research in contemporary architecture and spatial design. Through integration of technological innovations, design problems can be approached with many different perspectives. Using tailored software tools, ATLV is able to employ algorithms alongside electronic hardware and robotics to seek broader ideas of design, fabrication, and process.

Tokujin Yoshioka

吉冈德仁
吉岡徳仁
transparent mannequins

Considered ‘grid bodies’, or the ‘transparent body installation’ yoshioka has specially conceived these figures to highlight issey miyake’s garments. in room A, one finds the 1970s collections of miyake dressing figures composed out of 365 laser cut cardboard parts, arranged as a grid structure to create a futuristic human body. they are adorned by pieces that investigate miyake’s constant innovation in fabric-making, and his deep respect for tradition.

Viktoria Modesta

prototype
Viktoria Modesta is bionic artist, multimedia performance artist, creative director, DJ and a supporter of future innovations. Her work explores modern identity through performance, fashion, avant garde visuals, technology and science.

Steven Chilton Architects

SATELLITES
“By 2020, it is predicted some 6000 satellites will be orbiting the earth. From climate monitoring to communications, satellites are functioning to open up new horizons for us all. Our proposal for the Dubai Expo UK Pavilion, SATELLITES, aims to articulate and celebrate Britain’s unique contribution to this remarkable milestone, demonstrating how imagination, innovation and collaboration can change and improve lives around the world.” Steven Chilton Architects

Eric Klarenbeek, Designer of the unusual

Eye Jewellery
Eric Klarenbeek does special projects, or let’s say the unusual, for unusual people, projects or purposes. His studio connects creatives, designers, local crafts and clients by inventing new projects and products and believing our world can be so much better, more beautiful and honest. “My work is characterized by interaction and innovation. My products can be in motion, react on our presence or respond on developments in our society. I search for new meaning and principles in objects, for unexplored connections between materials, production methods, makers and users. Scale and appliance are irrelevant. I’ve designed jewellery, but also developed concepts to connect tourists to local craftsmen”, says Eric.

SARA SCHNADT

NETWORK
Sara Schnadt explores technology in her work both as subject and media. Her installations and performances use found objects, interactivity, projection, spatial illusions, and movement derived from common gestures. Much of her work involves representations or data that translate large quantities of socially resonant information into poetic forms, including data visualization. Schnadt often performs within accompanying sculptural environments, or sites works within functioning everyday spaces, attempting to articulate the personal within virtual and technological innovation.

Oleg Kulik

Sportswoman installation
Born in Kiev, Ukraine in 1961, Kulik graduated from Kiev Art School in 1979. In 1982 he went on to graduate from the Geological Survey College and moved to Moscow in 1988. In Moscow, while developing his own artistic practice, Kulik also became the art-director at the renowned Regina Gallery between 1990-93. In 1996 he was awarded a scholarship by the Berlin Senate and was given the medal ‘The Worthy’ by the Russian Art Academy in 2005. Now an infamous international artist, he won the III Annual Russian National Award for contemporary visual arts Innovation 2007 and the Kandinsky Prize in London at the Louise Blouin Foundation in 2009. In 2009 Kulik came officer of the Order of Arts and Letters, France. A performance artist, sculpture and curator, Oleg Kulik is best known for his work with animals, particularly his violent performances where he assumes the character of a dog. Channeling specific cultural discontent through his performances at a time of rapid change in Russia, Kulik’s work has continued to provoke and unsettle audiences globally.

Noa Raviv

Noa is fascinated by the tension between harmony and chaos, tradition and innovation, sensitively seeking for the perfect balance. She likes to observe and look for the uniqueness and beauty in the mundane and ordinary. uniqueness and beauty in the mundane and ordinary.

Pauline Van Dongen

Pauline van Dongen researches the body in a technologically textured space. After graduating from ArtEZ, Academy of the Arts in Arnhem, the Netherlands, she started her own womenswear label in 2010. Pauline operates a meticulous research of the behaviour of experimental and high-tech materials, combining new technologies with traditional techniques to constantly renovate craftsmanship. Working closely with companies from the field of science and innovation, Pauline aims to merge fashion and technology giving life to scientific creations.

SARAH BUCHANAN

سارة بوكانان
Empire of the Clouds is a dramatic futuristic representation of aviation achievements, throughout the past, present and future. Inspired by the true design innovation and achievement from machines of flight throughout the entirety of the concept. Focusing on model making to gain a unique perspective and develop an understanding of the overwhelming human drive, almost obsession, to achieve what we cannot do naturally, to fly. Passionate about research Buchanan has a meticulous attitude towards uncovering all elements in a concept. In this collection it enabled a distinctive perspective to a large subject, creating a concept based around model making and accessibility of a globally collective dream.

IRIS VAN HERPEN

Айрис Ван Эрпен
イリス ヴァン ヘルペン
Escapism

Iris van Herpen stands for a reciprocity between craftsmanship and innovation in technique and materials. She creates a modern view on Haute Couture that combines fine handwork techniques with futuristic digital technology .Van Herpen forces fashion to the extreme contradiction between beauty and regeneration. It is her unique way to reevaluate reality and to express and underline individuality.

bam! studio

HE
‘He’ by the Turin-based studio Bam! Bottega di Architettura metropolitana, is a large volume suspended that creates a shaded space that is cool by day and then transforms into a luminous and evocative lantern accompanying the evenings and events promoted within the YAP Summer Program. Lightness, transparency, innovation and flexibility are the characteristics of ‘He’ that are capable of making the museum a place in which culture, fun and free time may converse.

PETER MOVRIN

Wearable Sculpture
He designs with meticulous attention to detail and longing for newness. Leather and wool are still his favourite materials. To get the effect of surprise he juxtaposes these two traditional materials with others, perhaps not typically associated with the textile industry. An important part of his design process is treating natural and synthetic fabrics with various methods, using heat, chemicals or other techniques, thus combining innovation and tradition.

CERN

Globe of Science and Innovation
History of the universe
Did you know that the matter in your body is billions of years old?

According to most astrophysicists, all the matter found in the universe today — including the matter in people, plants, animals, the earth, stars, and galaxies — was created at the very first moment of time, thought to be about 13 billion years ago.
The universe began, scientists believe, with every speck of its energy jammed into a very tiny point. This extremely dense point exploded with unimaginable force, creating matter and propelling it outward to make the billions of galaxies of our vast universe. Astrophysicists dubbed this titanic explosion the Big Bang.
The Big Bang was like no explosion you might witness on earth today. For instance, a hydrogen bomb explosion, whose center registers approximately 100 million degrees Celsius, moves through the air at about 300 meters per second. In contrast, cosmologists believe the Big Bang flung energy in all directions at the speed of light (300,000,000 meters per second, a million times faster than the H-bomb) and estimate that the temperature of the entire universe was 1000 trillion degrees Celsius at just a tiny fraction of a second after the explosion. Even the cores of the hottest stars in today’s universe are much cooler than that.
There’s another important quality of the Big Bang that makes it unique. While an explosion of a man-made bomb expands through air, the Big Bang did not expand through anything. That’s because there was no space to expand through at the beginning of time. Rather, physicists believe the Big Bang created and stretched space itself, expanding the universe.

PAULINE VAN DONGEN

wearable solar

There is nothing natural in nature; technology makes our humanness giving form to our surroundings. The human habitat reveals a techno-morphed structure that can no longer be hidden behind the vestiges of a natural world: technology has to be naturalized. Pauline van Dongen researches the body in a technologically textured space. After graduating from ArtEZ, Academy of the Arts in Arnhem, the Netherlands, she started her own womenswear label in 2010. Pauline operates a meticulous research of the behaviour of experimental and high-tech materials, combining new technologies with traditional techniques to constantly renovate craftsmanship. Working closely with companies from the field of science and innovation, Pauline aims to merge fashion and technology giving life to scientific creations.

Philippe Druillet

BD
Philippe Druillet ist ein französischer Comiczeichner und -schöpfer sowie ein Innovator im Bereich visuelles Design. Druillet wurde in Toulouse, Haute-Garonne, Frankreich, geboren, verbrachte seine Jugend jedoch in Spanien und kehrte 1952 nach dem Tod seines Vaters nach Frankreich zurück. Als Science-Fiction- und Comic-Fan arbeitete Philippe nach dem Abitur als Fotograf und zeichnete nur zu seinem eigenen Vergnügen. Sein erstes Buch erschien 1966 mit dem Titel Le Mystère des abîmes (Das Geheimnis des Abgrunds). Es stellte seinen wiederkehrenden Helden Lone Sloane vor und spielte mit Science-Fiction-Themen, die teilweise von seinen Lieblingsautoren H. P. Lovecraft und A. E. van Vogt inspiriert waren. Später schuf Druillet Buchcover für Neuveröffentlichungen von Lovecrafts Werken sowie zahlreiche Filmplakate. Nachdem Druillet 1970 regelmäßig Beiträge für das französisch-belgische Comic-Magazin Pilote verfasste, wurde seine Lone Sloane-Saga immer extravaganter, da er Innovationen wie kühne Seitendesigns und computergenerierte Bilder verfolgte.

Richard Nicoll

Fiber Optic Dress
At the intersection of fashion and digital innovation comes wearable tech. Giving analog clothing and accessories a futuristic upgrade, it promises to completely redefine their form and function. One of the most stunning examples of the tech-chic trend is a headline-making dress dubbed the “jellyfish.” Created by designer Richard Nicoll, it appeared to float down the runway at London Fashion Week exuding the same phosphorescent glow of the eerily gorgeous sea creatures that inspired it. (Except his dress used strings of fiber optics—no stinging tentacles here!)

MATIJA ČOP

Matija voulait créer des vêtements qui s’inspiraient de types historiques sans s’appuyer sur des techniques de construction traditionnelles. Il s’est consciemment abstenu de tricoter, de coudre ou d’adhérer pour développer un système expérimental de fabrication: les scans 3D du corps sont manipulés à l’aide d’un logiciel de modélisation, transposés en motifs découpés au laser 2D, puis rationalisés à travers des scripts en formes qui peuvent être imbriquées comme un puzzle. pièces. L’objet résultant est un polyèdre complexe sans aucune couture. Plus important encore, le processus qui le crée est une variation entièrement originale du tissage avec des possibilités illimitées pour un design novateur et une nouvelle construction. En associant manuellement des centaines de pièces uniques découpées au laser à un savoir-faire techno-couture, il rend tangible une pensée ambitieuse et intégrée. L’œuvre de Matija esthétise la curiosité en s’efforçant constamment d’authentifier la possibilité d’une véritable innovation dans la mode contemporaine.

Matija Čop

Matija wanted to create garments that drew upon historical types without relying on traditional techniques of construction. He consciously abstained from knitting, sewing, or adhesion to develop an experimental system of fabrication: 3D scans of the body are manipulated using modelling software, transposed into 2D laser-cut patterns, and then rationalised through scripts into shapes that can be interlocked like puzzle pieces. The resultant object is a complex polyhedron without any seams. More significantly, the process that creates it is an entirely original variation of weaving with unlimited possibilities for novel design and new construction. Manually interlocking hundreds of unique laser-cut pieces with techno-couture craftsmanship, he makes ambitious and integrated thought tangible. Matija’s work aestheticises curiosity by striving constantly to authenticate the possibility of genuine innovation in contemporary fashion.

SHIRO KURAMATA

倉俣 史朗
glass chair

Shiro Kuramata’s approach to designing objects reflects the atmosphere of innovation in postwar Japan. By 1970, Kuramata had introduced alternative materials such as acrylic and glass into his furniture, which played on traditional ideas of materiality and form.Transparency, the appearance of weightlessness, and a Minimalist vocabulary quickly became his signature aesthetic. In 1976, Kuramata designed Glass Chair. Its reductivist and planar form reflects his interest in geometry as well as the effect of light as it transforms and illuminates the glass. Kuramata, like many of his Japanese contemporaries, looked to Western culture for inspiration. In particular, the sculptures of Donald Judd and Dan Flavin influenced Kuramata’s furniture designs of the 1970s, such as Glass Chair.

JAMES LAW CYBERTECTURE INTERNATIONAL

Cybertecture Egg
Cybertecture is the revolutionary concept that provides a symbiotic relationship between the urban fabric and technology. Pioneered in 2001, Cybertecture forges both the hardware of the built environment and software systems and technologies from the micro to macro scales of development.The genesis of Cybertecture is in response to man’s progress into the 21st century, where working and living environments need to adapt and evolve to cope with the demands of modern working life. It plays an integral part in this evolution by providing awareness and connectivity via seamless integration of technology into the fabric of space.Cybertecture designs, from technology, products and interiors to systems, buildings and masterplans, allow flexibility and accessibility to inform, adapt, react, communicate, manipulate and control environments, whilst being sustainable and environmentally considered in application and context.Cybertecture embraces the future through continuous innovation and evolution of design and technology. It provides a myriad of solutions, all of which are diverse in individual application but holistic to the overall user environment, and always being integrated with innovation being pursued.

DOUGLAS C. ENGELBART

دوجلاس إنجلبرت
道格拉斯·恩格尔巴特
דאגלס אנגלברט
ダグラス·エンゲルバート
더글라스 엥겔바트
Дуглас Энгельбарт
The first mouse

On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90-minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared-screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface.

INVISIBLE CAR

MERCEDES-BENZ “Invisible Drive”
The Mercedes-Benz F-CELL is the first hydrogen-powered car, which is ready for series production. With a spectacular action we draw a suitable attention to this innovation: We made people experience F-CELL the same way the environment does – like it’s not even existent. In practice: We disguised the B-Class F-CELL with mats out of LEDs on the one side and fixed a camera on the other side of the car. The camera filmed everything that happened behind the vehicle and transferred every action directly to the LED mats. The effect: The B-Class fused completely with its surrounding and became invisible for the passersby in the immediate vicinity.