FILE LED SHOW Neuroscientific-Installation

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FILE FESTIVAL

FILE LED SHOW

saccade

Neuroscientific-Installation
We are invited to São Paulo for our vertical light and sound installation which will transform the facade of São Paulo’s one of the most important architecture which is Fiesp Led Building.
We started this project with the idea that Neuroscience and simultaneous movement of both eyes between two or more phases of fixation in the same direction algorithms, and we transform the high-resolution led screen into a media canvas which transformed into living architecture.

Driessens & Verstappen

Breed
Breed (1995-2007) is a computer program that uses artificial evolution to grow very detailed sculptures. The purpose of each growth is to generate by cell division from a single cell a detailed form that can be materialised. On the basis of selection and mutation a code is gradually developed that best fulfils this “fitness” criterion and thus yields a workable form. The designs were initially made in plywood. Currently the objects can be made in nylon and in stainless steel by using 3D printing techniques. This automates the whole process from design to execution: the industrial production of unique artefacts.
Computers are powerful machines to harness artificial evolution to create visual images. To achieve this we need to design genetic algorithms and evolutionary programs. Evolutionary programs allow artefacts to be “bred”, rather than designing them by hand. Through a process of mutation and selection, each new generation is increasingly well adapted to the desired “fitness” criteria. Breed is an example of such software that uses Artificial Evolution to generate detailed sculptures. The algorithm that we designed is based on two different processes: cell-division and genetic evolution.

Shinseungback Kimyonghun

Cloud Face
Humans see figures in clouds: animals, faces and even god. This kind of perception also appears in machine vision. Face-detection algorithms sometimes find faces where there are not any.’Cloud Face’ is a collection of cloud images that are recognized as human faces by a face-detection algorithm. It is a result of machine vision’s error but they often look like faces to human eyes too. Humans, yet, know these are not actual faces. Humans rather imagine faces from the clouds. Here, the error of machines and the imagination of humans meet.

Tzu-Jung (Dexter) Huang

Meta-prosthesis
‘Meta-prosthesis’ explores the potential of synthesising the natural and artificial to increase the performance of environmental design. Through capitalising on the formal and compositional expressions derived from animalistic attributes, the performance of materials and environment can be enhanced. The project for a theraputic centre has a highly-articulated envelope which is achieved by manipulating the geometry, from the microscale to the macro. This includes: material typology, texture typology, surface typology and building typology. The resultant patterns are informed, generated and tested through computational algorithms and scientific understanding to satisfy different programmatic criteria, regulating the environment.

Thom Kubli

Brazil Now
BRAZIL NOW is a composition that addresses increasing militarization and surveillance within urban areas. Its geographical and acoustic reference is São Paulo, the largest megacity in Latin America. The piece is based on field recordings that capture the symptoms of a Latin American variant of turbo-capitalism with its distinctive acoustic features. Eruptive public demonstrations on the streets are often accompanied by loud, carnivalesque elements. These are controlled by a militarized infrastructure, openly demonstrating a readiness to deploy violence. The sonic documents are analyzed by machine learning algorithms searching for acoustic memes, textures, and rhythms that could be symptomatic for predominant social forces. The algorithmic results are then used as a base for a score and its interpretation through a musical ensemble. The piece drafts a phantasmatic auditory landscape built on the algorithmic evaluation of urban conflict zones.

Stine Deja

Synthetic Seduction

Foreigner

Stine Deja and Marie Munk

The title of the exhibition was inspired by Sherry Turkle’s theory of how technology seduces us, making emotions “easy” by offering human relationships without the complexity of being together ‘face to face’. But if machines can become attentive and emotional, what is left to distinguish us as human beings? We are facing a paradigm shift in how we understand ourselves physiologically, as data and algorithms, and are being forced to question the role of our biological body. As the relationship between artificial and human intelligence becomes increasingly intermingled in our everyday lives, Synthetic Seduction provides immersive and timely insight into the limits of human empathy and intimacy. We are glad at SixtyEight Art Institute to host such a space for thought. We hope it will start conversations and maybe even encourage some intimacy among our visiting audiences in the coming weeks.

Thomas Depas

Princess of Parallelograms
What will happen when our imagination itself is externalized in machines? Artificial intelligence constructs its own world-truth that is beyond our sensory perception. Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) use algorithms to synthesize and generate images in a completely new way. These images have almost uncanny aesthetic characteristics, seeming to emerge from an ocean of data, a kind of pixel soup. Rather as if we were observing the emergence of artificial thought.” The machine learns to understand the “essence” of a thing, be it an animal, the face of a celebrity or a body of text. It is then able to generate new images of this thing, including faces of celebrities who do not exist, mutant animals, or new texts. Eventually, AI will be capable of instantaneously and dynamically emulating all representations. The era of the optical machine and the capture of reality will then be at an end, supplanted by the era of machines that generate their own reality.

Refik Anadol

Quantum memories
Quantum Memories is Refik Anadol Studio’s epic scale investigation of the intersection between Google AI Quantum Supremacy experiments, machine learning, and aesthetics of probability. Technological and digital advancements of the past century could as well be defined by the humanity’s eagerness to make machines go to places that humans could not go, including the spaces inside our minds and the non-spaces of our un- or sub-conscious acts. Quantum Memories utilizes the most cutting-edge, Google AI’s publicly available quantum computation research data and algorithms to explore the possibility of a parallel world by processing approximately 200 million nature and landscape images through artificial intelligence. These algorithms allow us to speculate alternative modalities inside the most sophisticated computer available, and create new quantum noise-generated datasets as building blocks of these modalities. The 3D visual piece is accompanied by an audio experience that is also based on quantum noise–generated data, offering an immersive experience that further challenges the notion of mutual exclusivity. The project is both inspired by and a speculation of the Many-Worlds Interpretation in quantum physics – a theory that holds that there are many parallel worlds that exist at the same space and time as our own.

Alisa Andrasek

This research used stigmergy behaviour, another example of agency-based systems, which could be programmed to be highly adaptive to local data. What is most intriguing and attractive in this case, is contrasting organic aesthetics emerging from algorithms like stigmergy, with its plant like formations, and the hyper-rationalisation and genericity of voxelised geometry. Different resolutions were introduced in the facade panels, by using an octree algorithm. The result is a building skin that from afar looks like a plant, but in close up has almost Minecraft-like aesthetics coming from a multi-resolution voxel field. Organic stigmergy (stígma + ergon) partly plays a role in the distribution of data through the facade field, rather than generating geometry. It leaves its imprint in the density of geometry

Tundra

Nomad
Inspired by the concept of digital nomads of 21st-century and based on various pieces and algorithms from TUNDRA’s previous highly acclaimed audio-visual installations premiered across the globe from USA to China, NOMAD brings the polar atmosphere of different TUNDRA site-specific installations into a randomly changing sequence of visual themes and patterns triggered by live-performed sound.

Studio A N F

Computer Visions 2
After more decades of trying to construct an apparatus that can think, we may be finally witnessing the fruits of those efforts: machines that know. That is to say, not only machines that can measure and look up information, but ones that seem to have a qualitative understanding of the world. A neural network trained on faces does not only know what a human face looks like, it has a sense of what a face is. Although the algorithms that produce such para-neuronal formations are relatively simple, we do not fully understand how they work. A variety of research labs have also been successfully training such nets on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of living brains, enabling them to effectively extract images, concepts, thoughts from a person’s mind. This is where the inflection likely happens, as a double one: a technology whose workings are not well understood, qualitatively analyzing an equally unclear natural formation with a degree of success. Andreas N. Fischer’s work Computer Visions II seems to be waiting just beyond this cusp, where two kinds of knowing beings meet in a psychotherapeutic session of sorts[…]

Refik Anadol

WDCH Dreams
The Los Angeles Philharmonic collaborated with media artist Refik Anadol to celebrate our history and explore our future. Using machine learning algorithms, Anadol and his team has developed a unique machine intelligence approach to the LA Phil digital archives – 45 terabytes of data. The results are stunning visualizations for WDCH Dreams, a project that was both a week-long public art installation projected onto the building’s exterior skin (Sept 28 – Oct 6, 2018) and a season-long immersive exhibition inside the building, in the Ira Gershwin Gallery.

Ani Liu

Untitled: (A Search for Ghosts in the Meat Machine)
What does it mean to be human? At first glance a simple question, the idea of being human is an unstable construct, continuously recrafted. Recent technological innovations allow us to redesign ourselves profoundly— from networked prosthetics and artificial intelligence, to the genetic code of life itself. Can our behaviors be reduced to algorithms? Can our bodies be upgraded with nonorganic integrations? Can sentience itself by manufactured in a lab? This set of nine sculptures examines personhood from anatomical, psychological, genetic, biochemical, behavioral, algorithmic, personal narrative and memory. In many ways, this installation is an emotional confrontation with being quantifiable.

Cinzia Campolese

Broken Panorama
The Specular series is a project that presents a set of audio-visual installations of different light sculptures created through the use of projected light and reflective materials.
Each sculpture redirects light in a different way and the reflective property of the material allows each sculpture to blend with its environment while also modifying our perception of its shape. Networks of algorithms generate interlinked sound and light. A cycle repeats but with infinite variations in multi-temporal-scales.

Charlie Behrens

Algorithmic Architecture
This short film is intended to encourage a creative audience to seek out Kevin Slavin’s talk Those Algorithms Which Govern Our Lives. It employs an effect which takes place in Google Earth when its 3D street photography and 2D satellite imagery don’t register correctly. This glitch is applied as a metaphor for the way that our 21st century supercities are physically changing to suit the needs of computer algorithms rather than human employees.

Quayola

Transient
Transient – Impermanent paintings is an audiovisual concert for two motorized pianos and two conductors in collaboration with generative algorithms. Hyper-realistic digital brushstrokes articulate endlessly on a large-scale projection as if on a real canvas. Each brushstroke is sonified with a piano note, creating polyphonic synesthetic landscapes. The project continues Quayola’s research on traditional artistic techniques in the context of human-machine relationship, this time gradually withdrawing from formal subjects and giving way to the computational substance: the algorithm.

Patrick Monte & Brian Questa

Anomy, for U.S.and Mexican News
Anomy, for U.S.and Mexican News uses news media RSS feeds in real time in combination with data sanitization and sound synthesis algorithms in order to create visual displacement and generate a non-linear musical score. Through immersion, adjacency, perpetuity, uncertainty, and content in real time, it offers a contemplative experience with mass media, censorship, and language in contemporary society. Information containing the letter “e” in news briefs from eleven different sources in English and Spanish will be redacted—each triggering a musical note. Inspired by lipogrammatic literature and concrete poetry, this piece uses the lipogram to call attention to subjectivity and control in mainstream news media. The result is both a rhythmically diverse sound piece and a visual document that continuously evolves along with the flow of information published by Mexican and American news outlets.

Anne-Sarah Le Meur & Jean-Jacques Birgé

Omni-Vermille
Omni-Vermille is based on computer-generated real-time 3D images. The programmed code allows light spots to oscillate against a dark background. The colors sometimes move dynamically, sometimes calmly across the projection surface; sometimes they evoke plasticity, sometimes depth. This continuous metamorphosis endows the contents of the images with a sensual, even lively quality. The metamorphosis designed by algorithms opens up a new time-based morphology of colors and forms for painting. The play of colors is accompanied by a stereophonic sound composition by Jean-Jacques Birgé (*1952, France). The sounds follow the shapes of the colors, only to stand out again the next moment: the combination of sound and image results entirely from the laws of random simultaneity.

jeanine jannetje

reawaken
Reawaken is a kinetic sculpture with 55 robotic arms, powered by 55 servo motors. The lowering of the arms causes an abstract print on paper. Technology mirrors humanity, and vice versa. In addition to creating beauty, technology is there to meet our needs. We, and our needs, have evolved to a point where we are so integrated that we consume technology on autopilot. We live in a time of mass production in which our daily devices increasingly mimick each other. A smartphone is a small tablet, a tablet a small computer and a computer a small television. The question of what this does with our imagination, together with the increasingly invisible technological progress such as algorithms and artificial intelligence, have been my starting point for Reawaken.

Refik Anadol

Machine Hallucination
Refik Anadol’s most recent synesthetic reality experiments deeply engage with these centuries-old questions and attempt at revealing new connections between visual narrative, archival instinct and collective consciousness. The project focuses on latent cinematic experiences derived from representations of urban memories as they are re-imagined by machine intelligence. For Artechouse’s New York location, Anadol presents a data universe of New York City in 1025 latent dimensions that he creates by deploying machine learning algorithms on over 100 million photographic memories of New York City found publicly in social networks. Machine Hallucination thus generates a novel form of synesthetic storytelling through its multilayered manipulation of a vast visual archive beyond the conventional limits of the camera and the existing cinematographic techniques. The resulting artwork is a 30-minute experimental cinema, presented in 16K resolution, that visualizes the story of New York through the city’s collective memories that constitute its deeply-hidden consciousness.

FIELD

System Aesthetics
The works in this series are part of an extensive research project by FIELD, exploring the most relevant machine learning algorithms in code-based illustrations […] We have started a deeper exploration of the less accessible information that is out there, such as scientific papers and open source code publications, to develop an understanding of these algorithms’ inner workings, and translate it into visual metaphors that can contribute to a public debate.

Adam Ferriss

Glitch art
Finding his own niche between new media arts and conceptualism, Adam Ferriss creates unique digital coding that manipulates, distorts, and engineers images into psychedelic terrains. At times, his technicolor abstractions feel organic despite their technological roots – an ambiguous craft born of the RGB Tricolor separation process and pixel sorting algorithms he so carefully employs. Using these “procedural mechanisms,” Ferriss initiates iterative changes in light and pixel structure of his given source material – creating a literally infinite array of compositional possibilities that grapple with human perception during an era of ubiquitous manufacture.

ADAM FERRISS

“Adam Ferriss is one of those technologically-minded creatives who is able to put his ever-growing knowledge of code and processing to use building aesthetically wondrous digital art for the rest of us to enjoy. His images make me feel like I’ve just taken some psychedelics and stepped into one of those crazy houses you get in funfairs, where there are giant optical illusions on every wall and the floor keeps moving under your feet, except these are made using algorithms and coding frameworks […]”

Jorinder Voigt

Jorinde Voigt is a contemporary German artist. Known for her coded drawing installations which resemble algorithms or sound waves, Voigt’s background in music and philosophical studies established her ongoing interest in probing scientific mapping processes. Throughout an inventive and playful drawing practice, her work visualizes thoughts and infinite spaces while examining the way in which information is represented visually.

Myriam Bleau

SOFT REVOLVERS
Soft Revolvers is a music performance for 4 spinning tops built with clear acrylic by the artist. Each spinning top, 10’ in diameter, is associated with an ‘instrument’ or part in an electronic music composition. The tops are equipped with gyroscopes and accelerometers that communicate wirelessly with a computer where the motion data collected (speed,unsteadiness at the end of a spin, acceleration spikes in case of collisions) informs musical algorithms designed in Pure Data. LEDs placed inside the tops illuminate the body of the objects in a precise counterpoint to the music.

satoru sugihara

A(g)ntense gallery installation
ATLV is a computational design firm based in los angeles, california. Founded by satoru sugihara, the studio pushes the boundaries of practice and research in contemporary architecture and spatial design. Through integration of technological innovations, design problems can be approached with many different perspectives. Using tailored software tools, ATLV is able to employ algorithms alongside electronic hardware and robotics to seek broader ideas of design, fabrication, and process.

Troika

AVA

Ava’ is Troika’s first sculptural manifestation of their exploration of algorithms. ‘Ava’ is the physical result of emergence and self organisation brought about by ‘growing’ a sculpture through the use of a computer algorithm that imitates the emergence of life by which complexity arises from the simplest of things. As such the sculpture probes at the nature of becoming, existence and our strive to understand and replicate the complexities of life.In a landscape where our personal data is a raw material, and where we, humans, have become subordinate spectators of algorithms and a computerised infrastructure, we ask the question how much or little are we capable of influencing our surrounding reality, how much is predetermined, how much is down to chance.

Studio Drift

L’Orfeo.
Dutch National Touring Opera’s production of L’Orfeo.
Artist Lonneke Gordijn, together with director Monique Wagenmakers and choreographer Nanine Linning, created a new interpretation of L’Orfeo.
The kinetic sculpture EGO, specially developed for LOrfeo, is a handwoven block controlled by algorithms and motors. The block has the ability to shift its shape and state, embodying Orfeo’s perspectives and thoughts. The oldest opera combined with modern cutting edge technology.

Michael Frank

Beetle in Undergrowth
“I have a strong background in zoology and botany. When I’m rendering realistic or fanciful depictions of flora and fauna, I constantly fall back on my studies and research. Since all of my artwork involves 3D computer imaging, I rely heavily on organic geometry and algorithms that govern natural branching and growth patterns. My art mimics nature in more ways than one.” Michael Frank

adi meyer

Aposema:Responsive Facial Prosthesis
In an age of emotion recognition algorithms and augmented realities, our overuse of personal devices and social media, has led to a society where people increasingly choose technological alternatives to meaningful in-person interaction. Our ability to read facial expressions is severely reduced, limiting our capacity to develop relationships and leaving us struggling to empathize.

Espadaysantacruz studio

Interactive Chalk Cars
“Interactive chalk cars” is an installation based on a traditional children ́s game, that was originally played on the streets. It uses new digital technologies to review a non-technological game. By using computer vision algorithms and projection mapping, it brings together the real and the virtual. In doing this, we try to combine two playing modes that are usually confronted: the individual video game and the outdoor social game.
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Plummer Fernandez

Sound Chair
British/ Colombian Artist and Designer Matthew Plummer-Fernandez makes work that critically examines sociocultural entanglements with technologies. His current interests span algorithms, bots, automation, copyright, 3D files and file-sharing. He publishes his research on the peer-favoured algopop blog.

princemio and onformative

Pathfinder
Created by Princemio in collaboration with onformative and presented at Choreographic Coding laboratory in Frankfurt 2013, the Pathfinder project was created with aim to contribute to the creative processes of choreographic development. To achieve this algorithms have been developed to stimulate the dancers and to create visual inspirations. By doing this, the software becomes its own creative building block, questioning the classical master slave paradigm.

JONTY HURWITZ

Anamorphic sculpture

London-based artist Jonty Hurwitz creates ‘Anamorphic Sculptures’ which only reveal themselves once facing a reflective cylinder. Hurwitz took an engineering degree in Johannesburg where he discovered the fine line between art and science. He has lived in England for many years, working in the online industry though he quietly levitated into the world of art inspired by a need to make ‘something real’. Hurwitz discovered that he could use science as an artistic paintbrush. Each of his sculptures is a study on the physics of how we perceive space and is the stroke of over 1 billion calculations and algorithms.
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Peter Zimmermann

Currents

Peter Zimmermann is one of those artists who manage to find their own unique style and whose works are easily recognisable. His style is undoubtedly connected with a special technique, which features a combination of computer graphics and painting. Peter broadly uses capabilities of computer graphic software (principally Photoshop), making it an essential part of the creative process. Using different graphic algorithms, he modifies the source image until it becomes unrecognizable, abstract.

GIUSEPPE RANDAZZO

Джузеппе Рандаццо
stone fields (Using computer algorithms)

This project has started from a search for a 3d-objects optimal packing algorithm over a surface, but evolved in something rather different. I love the work by Richard Long, from which this project takes its cue. The way he fills lonely landscapes with arcaic stones patterns and its eroic artistic practice, in his monumental vision, is in strong contrast with this computational approach that – ironically – allows virtual stones creation and sorting in a non physical, mental way, a ‘lazy’ version, so to speak. The virtual stones created from several fractal subdivision strategies, find their proper position within the circle, with a trial and error hierarchical algorithm. A mix of attractors and scalar fields (some with Perlin noise) drives the density and size of the stones. The code is a C++ console application that outputs a OBJ 3d file.

Raffaello D’Andrea and Max Dean

The Table
The Table is an autonomous robot with an automatic mechanized system able to react to unexpected movement or obstacles and to carry out one or more tasks by executing a program in a given environment. As is the case with most “prototypical” robotic works, or single editions, the basic physical components can be pre-manufactured then modified or custom built to meet specific needs. In the case of The Table, the control system and its algorithms were entirely conceived by Max Dean and Raffallo D’Andrea. All the components, including the wheels and motors, were also custom manufactured, giving the installation a unique character. The singular characteristic of this work lies in the robotic nature of the table and it’s capacity to operate in an environment specifically designed for it. For example, the shade of red painted on the floor is directly linked to the effective functioning of the camera and the control software. Also, the space lights used in the room produce a light that prevents the creation of shadows, which the software could mistakenly interpret as a physical presence.

TAMAS WALICZKY

Marionettes
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“Marionettes” is a seven-minute computer animation about collapse. Marionettes are controlled by strings: if there is no string, they collapse. Nobody animates the body. If nobody animates the body, it will be animated by natural forces. Mass. Gravity. Collision. Randomization. In this animation, the animator does not animate in traditional terms. Thus, we might say it is an anti-animation.
The forces that control the movements of the marionettes are calculated by physical simulation algorithms. Therefore, these movements are strictly mathematical ones. They are dramatic, too. They visualize collapse in its physical and – amazingly enough from puppets animated by machines – psychological sense.

dextro

non-linear algorithms

Dextro writes ‘non-linear code’ drawing inspiration from nature. The results are non-fractal or random programs that iterate without change, with equal rules for all objects. Most of the scripts rely on trigonometry and could be seen as sets of wave generators interacting with one another. Some of these pieces take years to develop but the code is usually short but complex.
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REZA ALI

EMERGENT
According to wikipedia, “emergence is the way complex systems and patterns arise out of a multiplicity of relatively simple interactions.” Thus “EMERGENT” was created using a particle system that was given basic rules of behavior, this is very similar to swarm algorithms using in architecture to create 3D forms. The application/particle system was created/simulated using Processing and OpenGL. The particle trails (locations over time) were imported to Maya using a MEL script and then animated to show their growth over time. I developed a (pretty complex) Processing application that helped me simulate the particle system (300 particles, with per particle interaction) in real-time.